Jump to content

11 week old sleeping on belly


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 KylieMH

Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:35 PM

Hi there

my son turns 11 weeks tomorrow. he has never been a great day sleeper..20 minutes here, 40 minutes there. just recently i have started laying him on his belly, and he seems to settle much quicker, and sleeps longer...i know this isnt ideal, and i find myself in his room checking on him ever minute..but seems i have to go with it.

anyone else with issues with this little one not being a good day sleeper?
i have tried swaddling etc, but he is now over 6kgs and so strong, he breaks free from it in no time, and his hands wake him up, as he whacks himself...

would love to hear any advice

#2 giggleandhoot

Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:41 PM

saw this in recent topics. DD2 slept on tummy. she had tummy problems and it was the only way she would sleep. She always had strong neck and head movement, but i kept checking heaps on her just incase. It was bliss to get just some sleep..so we stuck with it!

#3 girltribe4

Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:47 PM

My first and second babies were tummy sleepers from very early on , it was quite terrifying especially with the 1st .
I just made sure we followed every other safety precaution and I did use one of those sensor mats .

#4 lucky 2

Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:42 PM

QUOTE
..but seems i have to go with it.

No you don't have to go with it Kylie, tummy sleeping is included as a SIDS risk, as the adult you are able to make decisions as to what is safest in any situation, he is too immature to be able to make himself safe.
When he falls asleep you could turn him over on his back?

It would be a different situation if your medical provider has advised you to sleep your baby on the front.
Perhaps you could call your CHN +/- GP for their advice?

#5 WaitForIt

Posted 26 November 2012 - 09:20 PM

QUOTE (lucky 2 @ 26/11/2012, 02:42 PM)
15109107[/url]']
No you don't have to go with it Kylie, tummy sleeping is included as a SIDS risk, as the adult you are able to make decisions as to what is safest in any situation, he is too immature to be able to make himself safe.
When he falls asleep you could turn him over on his back.

It would be a different situation if your medical provider has advised you to sleep your baby on the front.
Perhaps you could call your CHN +/- GP for their advice?


To add to this, SIDS peaks at 2-4 months.
I know it's hard, I've discovered DD tries to self settle on her side. I roll her onto her back when asleep but I do wonder if she'd sleep longer if I just left her. This is something I'm not going to discover until she is over a year old and past the SIDS risk.


#6 chillibean

Posted 26 November 2012 - 10:03 PM

Not sure about belly sleeping (I would be concerned about SIDS), but for the swaddling have you tried the ergo cocoon?

They can't get out of that!

We swaddled DD2 in one of these until about 8 months!  Even now, she is sleeping in one with the arms out.

Super easy...

#7 Dragonfly2

Posted 26 November 2012 - 11:38 PM

I have a tummy sleeper here, DD2 is 18 weeks now and sleeps all sleeps on tummy now, she can roll too so i cant stop her.

But when she was tiny i had her in a sleep postioner on her side in the day and on her back at night, then from about 2 months I would let her sleep in the recovery position with a rolled flannel supporting her leg so she couldnt sleep flat on her face, in the day and she would sleep on her side at night. She is in an ergo coon too which is great for tummy sleepers, stretchy so she can get her hands up, but doesnt wake herself up. My bub is strong too, so once I was confident she could turn her head, only then i let her sleep on her tummy, well mostly, i tended to do the recovery position or put a rolled flannel, under hip, rib caged so she was on a slight tilt. Yes SIDs is something to keep in mind, but at my 3 month check with the health nurse she was fine with it, just advising that I make sure there was nothing, eg bedding near her head and all other SIDs reccomendations were followed.

#8 maybethree

Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:32 AM

I was too scared to try with DD1 but when DD2 was born it was the middle of a heatwave and I felt that swaddling her was a bigger risk than letting her sleep on her tummy.  She has always been a great sleeper.  I don't think I'd ever feel confident about it enough to advise anyone else to do the same - it is a very personal decision knowing the research. However, if I had another baby, I would probably allow him/her to do the same.

#9 Alina0210

Posted 27 November 2012 - 12:45 AM

Quite a few of my friends/families kids were tummy sleeps from birth.... It worked for them

#10 Iwantitall

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:03 AM

Another fan of the Ergo cocoon here.  We recently purchased one because ds4 (10 weeks) was getting too big to wrap and he is now sleeping at least 12 hours overnight and at the least in 1 hour blocks during the day (usually more).   Before that he would only cat nap during the day with me bouncing him In his bouncer.....very frustrating.

We became good friends with someone who worked with SIDS Qld when we where having our first and heard so many sad stories.  I grilled him for all the SIDS info I could and have stuck too it, I just could not out my child at risk like that knowing what I know.

Eta. The Ergo Cocoon we just bought is designed for summer use so they don't get hot

Also I just don't get the attitude "I did it and my child is fine". Would you put you child in a car and not restrain them? If you know the risks why would you put your child at risk?

Edited by beljane, 27 November 2012 - 10:08 AM.


#11 josh2003

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:14 AM

No matter how strong you think they are, they can still be wrapped... you might have to just try a different technique - maybe the one where you kind of envelop their arms in the wrap first. My first baby was always waking himself up with his arms, so we wrapped him until he was about 8 months (we had to cut an old flannel sheet up to make it big enough!).

When I was a teenager, a family friend's baby was a tummy sleeper, and she died from SIDS at 12 weeks of age.

I'm sure there are plenty of babies that sleep on their tummy without any harm coming of it, but in my mind, it's not worth the risk.

#12 deejie

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:17 AM

Have you tried this swaddle? Made using a cot/bassinette sheet and an extra strip of material. It is unbreakable (seriously). DS1 never came close to escaping from it.

http://www.goddessinprogressblog.com/2007/11/uber-swaddle/

Having said that, DS2 had a strong preference for his stomach from early on. He became hysterical if swaddled. This was after spending an hour trying to settle him, passing out for 20-40 minutes, waking up crying and another hour settling and so on and so forth. All night. Every night. He didn't have reflux or any medical explanation for why he preferred his stomach. I only found out because I would put him down for tummy time and he would put himself to sleep on the mat.... and stay asleep for a couple of hours!

It made me uncomfortable. I didn't like it. It was a hard decision to make, sleeping him on his stomach before he could roll. We knew we had no other SIDS risk factors. Online research suggested that sleeping on stomach doubled the risk of SIDS (what we read suggested from 1/2000 to 1/1000). After I nearly had a serious car accident from sheer exhaustion and within a week of that nearly walked the double pram and myself in front of a bus at a roundabout because I didn't even register it was there, DH and I knew I needed more sleep. We made a mutual decision to sleep him on his stomach because for us, we felt that I would inevitably have an accident on night after night of dysfunctional broken sleep.

He was always strong with great neck control, but I still cannot tell you the relief I felt when he learnt to roll.



#13 shelly1

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:27 AM

I have 3 DD's. 1 and 3 slept on their backs but DD2 had terrible tummy issues and it was the only way she would sleep (after hours of screaming)

As for wraps I cant recomend the baby origami double wrap enough - if you could sew you could probably make it yourself . I couldnt wrap my girls to save myself - this was a godsend for DD3.

#14 KylieMH

Posted 27 November 2012 - 02:55 PM

thanks for your replies. I purchased the ergo wrap online today, so hope to get it in the next few days.

i agree , for me the risk of sids is very concerning for me, and therefore will persist in placing him down on his back.

today i have actually found an oversized sheet, and wrapped him up. this kept him swaddled perfectly...no if only his naps during the day were longer than 45 mins wink.gif

#15 soapy

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:07 PM

My DD mostly on her tummy. I did feel a bit nervous. I had a breathing monitor though which helped.

#16 soontobegran

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:10 PM

QUOTE (soapy @ 27/11/2012, 11:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My DD mostly on her tummy. I did feel a bit nervous. I had a breathing monitor though which helped.




Just want to stress that a breathing monitor will not stop SIDS. sad.gif

#17 4boysandme

Posted 27 November 2012 - 10:22 PM

Sadly one of my best friends lost her precious bub to SIDS at 16 weeks. He would only settle on his tummy, so she decided to take the risk. The guilt that has followed after loosing a tummy sleeping bub to SIDS is unimaginable & heartbreaking. My DS 3 would have slept well on his tummy from birth, but there was no way I would ever take that risk.... He still sleeps terribly at 10months (he is still in his ergo cocoon overnight). It's your choice, but the guidelines are there for a reason...
A breathing monitor will not stop SIDS but it will let you know straight away when something is wrong, giving you the best chance to take action.

#18 discomonkey

Posted 28 November 2012 - 07:31 AM

My DD is 9 weeks and has every one of her daytime sleeps strapped to my front (baby bjorn or hugabub). She hates being swaddled and has reflux. Maybe she would be happier on her tummy but I know they are this tiny and helpless for such a short amount of time so I'm willing to do it.
No judgements about what others are doing, but just wanted to add that perspective. Lucky for me she sleeps like a champ at night. We co-sleep which of course is a SIDS risk too but after some discussions with a few health professionals I have decided in comfortable with it. She is my third baby and is the first to be quite this needy but I figure if she needs extra cuddles now to feel calm and get the rest she needs, I'm happy to do it.



#19 BRB

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:22 AM

My DS was a nightmare sleeper. One day around 10 weeks old out if frustration with trying to get DS to sleep DH put him on his stomach and hey presto he slept! He was and still is terrible so it didn't fix it but made a big difference in how long he slept.  I know it's not recommended

#20 José

Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:32 AM

Ur little one is 6 kgs at 11 weeks? My DS is 6 kgs at 7 weeks. He was getting out of husband wraps so have started using love to dream swaddle. It hasn't increased his sleep but it eliminated the getting out of the wrap problem. I have tried sleepy wings as well and prefer love to dream. My DS Is not a good sleeper. Although im always tired I wouldn't take the risk of placing him to sleep on his front.

#21 MKTWINS

Posted 29 November 2012 - 06:59 PM

No way... not for me or my girls. I have an eleven week old daughter and almost 4 year old twins. I wrap her up so she's super snug with two muslim wraps. She did try to fight it when she was a few weeks old but she now thrives on it as she knows it's sleepy time. Would I sleep her on her tummy? Only if I was watching her like a hawk - sorry! And she's a fantastic sleeper when wrapped up..




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Britain's youngest parents: mother 12, father 13

A 12-year-old schoolgirl and her 13-year-old boyfriend are believed to have become Britain?s youngest parents, after the birth of their baby girl earlier this week.

When Prince George met Bilby George

Prince George has met an Aussie marsupial named after him in his first official engagement in Australia.

Asphyxia link another piece of the SIDS puzzle

An Australian study has uncovered information which could lead to a better understanding of why babies die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Pregnant woman dies after doctor removes ovary instead of appendix

When a UK woman went to hospital suffering appendicitis, doctors mistakenly removed her healthy ovary - with tragic consequences.

The milestones I can't wait to celebrate

Nothing can beat the feeling of witnessing that first smile, first step and first word - but here's a list of 'firsts' I'm really looking forward to now.

How you develop in your baby's first year

Just as babies undergo rapid growth as they learn and change in their first year, we?re learning and changing quickly as parents, too. Don?t underestimate the developmental stages you go through when you have a baby.

Can you make your baby smarter even before birth?

A product new to Australia claims to help babies be born "as intelligent as possible", but not all experts agree on the benefits of educating babies while still in the womb.

How a mother's love helped unearth the skills of an autistic savant

Autistic savant Ping Lian Yeak, a prodigious artist who has had his work shown all over the world, couldn't have done it without the support and love of his proud mum.

Rescue dog Zoey and BFF Jasper star in adorable pics

Photographer, self-professed "crazy dog lady" and mum Grace Chon takes photos of rescue dog Zoey and her 10-month-old son Jasper together. The results are just too cute. See more on Instagram @thegracechon.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

A tiny heart: a baby?s death gives life to another

Simon Alexander Garcia lived only one brief hour. But somewhere, a little girl?s heart is beating today because of him.

Ear piercing: what age is best?

What is it that shapes our opinions on what?s an 'appropriate' age for our children to get their ears pierced? Parents share their views on how young is too young when it comes to piercing.

Why is childbirth still such a pain?

The options given to women to help them cope in labour have barely changed in years.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Win the brand new phil&teds vibe

Check out the good looking new release of the Vibe 3 and the Verve 4-wheeler inline strollers. To celebrate their release, we have a Vibe with double kit to give away.

Baby sleep

From birth to one year and beyond, read about baby sleep, soothing techniques, routines, and sleep school experiences.

Easter gifts for babies, no chocolate in sight!

If this is your little one?s first Easter you might want to mark the occasion with something a little extra special. Here are 10 Easter gift ideas, which won't harm little teeth.

7 tips for a kid-free trip, not a guilt trip

Although I?m jumping out of my skin to take my child-free holiday, I?m dreading the goodbye. But I?m determined to make the most of it without tarnishing it with guilt or sadness about leaving the kids.

Itchibubs: clothes for babies and toddlers with eczema

Parents of children who suffer from eczema will know only too well the scratching that occurs around the clock. A new clothing range aims to help make everyone more comfortable.

Ear piercing: what age is best?

What is it that shapes our opinions on what?s an 'appropriate' age for our children to get their ears pierced? Parents share their views on how young is too young when it comes to piercing.

Caring for kids helps grandmothers stay mentally alert

Looking after grandchildren can help grandmothers ward off brain disease - but it's also possible to get too much of a good thing, researchers say.

Why I loved my third home water birth

After two water births at home, I was determined to give birth to my son the same way. I just hoped this birth would be quicker than my last two.

Revealed: 7 ways food marketers try to trick consumers

If you?re confused by food labels, you?re not alone. Next time you?re shopping for food, look out for these seven common labelling tricks.

'My mother-in-law found out our baby's gender behind our backs'

My husband and I mutually decided that we didn?t want to know our baby's sex before the birth, but his mother couldn't handle that.

 

Free Printable Activities

Keeping little hands busy

Free printable acitivity pages like colouring in, cutting, word finders, mazes, maths activities and puzzles.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.