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Centrelink at 18 while living at home?


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#1 Velvetta

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:19 PM

I don't know how this works anymore, having not been on the dole for about 20 years. My son has just finished school, he's 18, he has a part time but very unreliable job as a waiter  (as in shifts change from week to week, this week he only got one day). He is taking a gap year before uni and needs to save money.

I think he should "go on the dole" and then be able to access employment agencies - do you need to be on Newstart to do this?  Agencies would be better than walking the street dropping off resumes, surely?

He doesn't like the stigma of centrelink payments, but our family benefits part A will stop in two weeks and I think he needs to contribute.

I just don't know how the system works - are we obliged to support him 100% if he is living at home? I want to provide maybe  50 -75%, but he is an adult now and needs to start pulling his weight. We are middle income - about $95K between us, plus 4 more children under 15.
I know I can ask centrelink all this, but it's Saturday and I'm trying to work it all out.

Basically, what is he 'entitled' to and what not? He really wants to work BTW, DH and I both work, so I am SO not encouraging welfare dependency before you all jump on me original.gif
Thx

#2 Wyn99

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:27 PM

He can't get Newstart as it's for people over 22. He can apply for Youth Allowance but there is are Personal and Parental income assets tests which affect his rate of payment - you can read more here.

#3 Great Dame

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:28 PM

Why don't you contact Centrelink instead of EB?

#4 Lauren Bell

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:29 PM

Yes that all sounds ok, he would be on youth allowance, as new start is for over 21,NAND I think he'd have to report what he earns from his Job so he probably won't get much (it all depends on what you earn) I applied at the same age, while I was studying and it all went on what my mum earned. They offered me $60 a fortnight.
Good luck op.

#5 Lyn86

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:30 PM

Why don't you read the op Madame catty!

#6 Lauren Bell

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:31 PM

Madame catty, read the whole post before replying. Op said she knows she can contact centrelink but it Saturday night so she wants an idea of what will happen.

#7 Guest_bottle~rocket_*

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:35 PM

I'm not completely sure about this, but I think you will find that he is not entitled to anything.  Still best to check it out with Centrelink.

He could apply for Youth Allowance, but unless he qualifies as being "independent" for the purposes of this payment, there is a parental means test.  Your combined family income will be over the threshold for  payment.

Basically the government expects parents to support their children until they are at least 21 years old.  In some cases young people may be considered independent of their parents and the parental means test does not apply, but the criteria are quite strict.

http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/e...dependence-test

#8 mum201

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:39 PM

I would be encouraging him to go on seek.com.au, my career.com.au, pound the pavement of local retailers, pubs, restaurants, supermarkets and take away joints.
If you want to start charging him board, then do so when the whatever payment is about to stop, stops. Am sure he could make enough from one day a week to pay board. For anything else he wants....well then more motivation to find something else.....

#9 Laborious Nicety

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:40 PM

It's all there on the Centrelink site, complete with calculators.

http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/e...ome-assets-test

With a family income of 95k, he's screwed though as he is still considered your dependent.  He is eligible for jobseeker assistance though.



#10 Liadan

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:44 PM

He can apply for youth allowance, but he probably won't get anything from them as he is considered a dependent until he is 22.

#11 Velvetta

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:45 PM

OK thanks, but
QUOTE
Basically the government expects parents to support their children until they are at least 21 years old.
  OMG - 21!!!!

#12 Bluemakede

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:48 PM

i have no idea about the centrelink stuff, but there are plenty of job agencies that he can approach for work that do not require a centrelink job seeker number (and these angencies are more active at finding jobs for those on their books). Many of my friends have gotten work this way, even those in late teens.

#13 Great Dame

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:50 PM

QUOTE (Lyn86 @ 24/11/2012, 09:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why don't you read the op Madame catty!


I did.  But Centrelink had most (if not all) of their information on-line.   If you can contact EB, you can contact CL.

Besides, what the OP wants her son to do is completely different to what the son wants.  She can't force or apply for him.


#14 Lady Garden

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:51 PM

I think he should just look for a job. If government employment agencies were any good, there'd be no need for benefits.

#15 hollysmama

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:51 PM

At that age I thought you had to be 'earning or learning', not receiving benefits.

And I'm not quite sure I understand why you think he needs to get benefits so he can contribute just because your FTB has stopped?  So in other words, you want the government to keep contributing?

Edited by hollysmama, 24 November 2012 - 08:53 PM.


#16 Lil Chickens

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:51 PM

QUOTE (bottle~rocket @ 24/11/2012, 08:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm not completely sure about this, but I think you will find that he is not entitled to anything.  Still best to check it out with Centrelink.

He could apply for Youth Allowance, but unless he qualifies as being "independent" for the purposes of this payment, there is a parental means test.  Your combined family income will be over the threshold for  payment.

Basically the government expects parents to support their children until they are at least 21 years old.  In some cases young people may be considered independent of their parents and the parental means test does not apply, but the criteria are quite strict.

http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/e...dependence-test



QUOTE (mum201 @ 24/11/2012, 08:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would be encouraging him to go on seek.com.au, my career.com.au, pound the pavement of local retailers, pubs, restaurants, supermarkets and take away joints.
If you want to start charging him board, then do so when the whatever payment is about to stop, stops. Am sure he could make enough from one day a week to pay board. For anything else he wants....well then more motivation to find something else.....


These two posts sum it up pretty acurately.

#17 hollysmama

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:59 PM

QUOTE
are we obliged to support him 100% if he is living at home? I want to provide maybe 50 -75%, but he is an adult now and needs to start pulling his weight

Well he can start contributing when he finds a job. If he can't then maybe he should rethink the idea of a gap year since the whole purpose was to save money, and perhaps just go to uni instead.

#18 Velvetta

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:59 PM

QUOTE (hollysmama @ 24/11/2012, 08:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
At that age I thought you had to be 'earning or learning', not receiving benefits.

And I'm not quite sure I understand why you think he needs to get benefits so he can contribute just because your FTB has stopped?  So in other words, you want the government to keep contributing?



Wow rolleyes.gif , he wants work, I want him to work. He told me that job agencies will only accept people on unemployment registries; apparently that's not the case according to OPs.
We both work hard, but we are the 'working poor', we just cover our arses each month, and we very much don't want government contributions if we can help it. And I don't see why we should be obliged to support an adult to the age of 22! But if that's how it is, that's how it is.
I know my son doesn't want to lean on us either; he is determined to get out there and earn. I just thought Centrelink might might be a bridge, as he has no savings (his fault, that).
But I have read the centelink now and have forwarded it to him, so thanks.


#19 sandgropergirl

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:02 PM

Sounds to me like your son is pulling a fast one. Only job agencies indeed. What a crock.

#20 JuliaGulia

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:07 PM

QUOTE
And I don't see why we should be obliged to support an adult to the age of 22! But if that's how it is, that's how it is.


Well, you're not really obliged to support him.  You're within your rights to kick him out if you want to.  You're just not entitled to government support for a young adult who has chosen not to study and hasn't found work.

And at $95,000pa I wouldn't consider you working poor.  There are plenty of families surviving on less than half of that.

#21 mum201

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:09 PM

Your son is telling a massive porky regarding recruitment agencies! They want whatever applicants they can get their hands on to make placements. Once again, point him in the direction of seek.com.au......
Oh, there's also call centre jobs, factory jobs, unskilled labouring jobs......tons of stuff if you look hard enough. I have a 21 year old DSS who took 2 gap years and always found work (didn't always like it.......which is what motivated him to go to uni!)

#22 WinterDancesHere

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:11 PM

QUOTE (Velvetta @ 24/11/2012, 09:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wow rolleyes.gif , he wants work, I want him to work. He told me that job agencies will only accept people on unemployment registries; apparently that's not the case according to OPs.


It might not technically be the case but there is truth in what he is saying. The job agencies that run through the government employment services offer assistance to people with a job seeker ID that have been referred through centrelink. They do advertise jobs to all willing applicants but unless it is a rare skilled position someone without that link wont get the job because they will get funding for placing someone who needs higher assistance. This is based on information from a family member who works in the industry.

Even if he can't receive any financial benefit I beleive he can still register for a job seeker ID, but wont get the intensive assistance.

Private job agencies (like Hays for example) are not the same so it is worthwhile registering with them.

Edited by WinterDancesHere, 24 November 2012 - 09:13 PM.


#23 jayskette

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:11 PM

Good intentions and all, but this idea is pretty stupid. Anybody knows the "job agencies" attached to Centrelink don't really help people find any decent jobs. You are better off just cold calling the local shopping centre and get a decent retail job quicker than you can register with one of them crap places.

#24 I look incredible

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:24 PM

Here's  a question OP, how would you go about seeking work if you'd just left high school, or just arived in a foreign country called non-child-adult-teen-land?



What did you actually do when you were his age?

#25 Lil Chickens

Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:31 PM

QUOTE (JuliaGulia @ 24/11/2012, 09:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
And at $95,000pa I wouldn't consider you working poor.  There are plenty of families surviving on less than half of that.


I'm glad someone said what I was thinking.  My husband and I earn a little less than that combined and there is no way I would call us the 'working poor'.  I would thinking I would be insulting those who are actually 'the working poor'.

OP, your son can find work through plenty of other avenues - not just the Government contracted Employment Services Agencies.  Google recruitment agencies (or check the yellow pages).

As another PP said you can set his board and expect it paid regardless how much he earns - just like a landlord would.  He will have to find a solution.




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