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Eating meat


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#1 Guest_Maybelle_*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:32 AM

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Edited by Maybelle, 27 December 2012 - 09:24 PM.


#2 Lolpigs

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:36 AM

Bacon. Your body will digest whatever you put into it, its about your mind more than anything. Don't go straight for red meat. A steak is a good way to turn yourself off.



#3 Neko NoNo

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:41 AM

I am sorry for your health problems. It's a shame to have to go back to meat after so long. I was veg for 9 years and I had chronic anemia and went back to meat. I started with ham and bacon. It took me a while to eat steak etc- I would say about 4 months till I gave it a shot and then I was fine

You might be able to handle it better if you include a little bit of meat in other foods. A risotto with chicken, a curry with a bit of pork in it, stir fry with a bit of beef. You could also try half a sausage every now and then with anything else you are eating. Remember you really only need to eat meat 3 or so times a week to get the necessary iron etc.

good luck


Edited by Kate-ko, 22 November 2012 - 11:42 AM.


#4 Guest_Maybelle_*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:41 AM

QUOTE (Lolpigs @ 22/11/2012, 09:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Bacon. Your body will digest whatever you put into it, its about your mind more than anything. Don't go straight for red meat. A steak is a good way to turn yourself off.


Yeah, I learned my lesson about the steak...especially as my non-cooking husband cooked it for me and it was very tough  sick.gif

Does bacon have any health benefits?  I am trying to be healthy.  I shove enough crap into my body already.

Thankyou  original.gif

#5 d├ęsir d'amour

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:42 AM

I wouldn't start with bacon, personally.  Strong, salty taste and I personally find the smell offputting.

Roast chook would be the starting point I would suggest.  Mild flavour, easy to shred and hide.  Apricot chicken, chicken quiche, stirfries.

AFter that, fish.  I'm not sure what would be considered mild, but I'm not into strong fish, and I eat barramundi, salmon and tuna (well disguised). You can do an easy tuna pasta with tinned tomatos, buttloads of herbs, wine.  Can't even taste it.

After that, mince.  This might be the time to introduce your red meat.  Patties with lots of vege and rice, inside a burger.  Spaghetti bol, heavily disguised with herbs and wine.  Chilli con carne, with lots of lentils.

Pork would be the very last thing I would consider, as mentioned before, I find the smell of cooking pork extremely offputting.

#6 FeralBob!

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:46 AM

I would add it almost as a flavouring IYKWIM. Chicken would be good, so you could make a stir fry or curry with a small amount of chicken and a much much larger amount of veges. Mince would also be good for that.

One thing I noticed after going back to eating meat (and this was a long time ago and after a much lesser time as a vego than you) was how little it took to make me feel really, really full.

#7 Froger

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:46 AM

I was vegetarian for most of my young life, and was vegan for a good 10 years.

I decided to start eating meat when I was in my early 30s, after being convinced that eating meat was healthier. I had never imagined myself being in this position, because I had been such an animal rights activist all my life that I was certain that even if eating meat was healthier, that I would just never do it for ethical reasons.

But as I got older, the health implications won out. I began to eat meat.

The first thing my then husband bought home for me to make was a whole fish. Head, eyes and all. I could have died. I couldn't cut it up, and then after he cut it up and cooked it I couldn't stomach eating it.  sick.gif

I then started off with stuff that was already cut up, like chicken pieces and minced meat - basically so I couldn't recognise that it had ever been an animal. I used small quantities until I got used to it. The hardest thing to get used to was the very different feel of the fat content of soups and stew and things like that, that had been made with meat. The fatty feel just felt so different to things that had only been cooked with vegetable fats.

Honestly, it was difficult to get used to, and a very emotional time. I'd sob over my cooking, and bawl my eyes out over dinner.

And also the mess! Oh the mess of cooking with meat. It splatters and spreads droplets of fat like nothing in the vegetable kingdom! This took ages to get used to, just the mere fact of so much fat splatter and so much cleaning.

I also didn't know how to cook meat. So I had to get ideas and recipes and get things sorted in my head. Dinners were a real trial and bother until I just learnt to cook naturally, eventually, with meat.

Now I'm okay. And I'm very convinced of the health benefits of a diet including meat over a pure vegetarian diet. I'd never go back. And everything is easy now. But is was truly hard in the beginning, because it is changing your whole way of life and entire way of thinking.

Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

#8 vanessa71

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

I haven't eaten red meat for about 28 years, the reason for it is that I just don't like it. I did stop eating chicken and fish for about 10 years and slowly reintroduced them.

I think the best thing is to start with something you do remember enjoying and I would be adding it to another dish, (such as chicken in a soup or risotto) so it's not a lump sitting on your plate.

Wishing you the best of luck with it.  original.gif

#9 FeralBob!

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

Yeah, I would also add to get lean meat, including mince. Fatty meat does have a whole nother mouth feel that you don't need when you're trying to reintroduce meat to your diet.

#10 Magnus

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:51 AM

I was raised vegetarian and then went non-veg by choice for about a year when I was a kid.

As someone raised vegetarian, I liked anything that didn't seem like meat-- lasagne with mince, hamburgers, etc. I thought chicken was disgusting and seafood seemed really rubbery and weird, but I found normal fish OK. I like the smell of bacon, but the texture is weird. I ate lunch meat fairly happily.

I think you might need to start yourself on the least meaty-seeming things.

#11 Mrs Dinosaurus

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:54 AM

I think mild white fish is a great way to start (especially if you like curries and can hide any hint of fish in the sauce with vegies). There are plenty of fish out there with bugger-all flavour and it digests very easily.

After that I would start by making a half mince/half bean pasta sauce (or even less if you prefer) while your body gets used to digesting it.

All the best with the change, my sister also did this although she started having severe cravings in her second pregnancy so it was a bit easier for her original.gif

#12 steppy

Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:57 AM

One of my friends did this (she said that as much as she hated to admit it, eating meat made her feel heaps better). She started as above - with foods where meat is a component rather than the main course and now eats most meats.

#13 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:00 PM

I was only vegetarian for 2 years but for health reasons advised to start eating meat again (I have thalassemia which causes low iron and so it was always fatigued as it was and it was suggested animal protein might help as it breaks down differently to plant protein or some sh*t).

I wouldn't be starting out with clumps of dead meat on your plate.

Maybe meat lasagna or little pieces in your risotto or pasta. Or you could do nachos or something with mince meat mixed with refried beans. I think I'd be hiding it amongst other textures initially and then as you get used to it expand your menu.

I'll make you a lasagna if you like original.gif

Edited by Sunnycat, 22 November 2012 - 12:01 PM.


#14 *LucyE*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:01 PM

I agree with adding small amounts into your regular meals. What sort of meals do you normally cook?

Also, find yourself a really good, old fashioned butcher. Meat for domestic use should be super fresh. You don't want to know what dodgy places do. Fresh meat tastes better than meat that's a few days old. An example is pork. Fresh pork is sweet yet so many people get turned off by stinky pork because its not super fresh.

Maybe start off with some meat based broths so you can adjust to the animal fats and flavor without having to eat the meat directly.

#15 noi'mnot

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:11 PM

I agree, broths are possibly a good way to go in order to get used to the taste gradually.

My dear friend went from vegan to omnivore after about 20 years. She started with broths and very mild white fleshed fish, then moved to chicken, then lamb, then beef. Now she eats bloody steaks (about 5 years later).

She found it easiest to have minced and hidden forms of the meat first - so thai fish cakes, chicken dumplings, etc. Plenty of flavour to drown out the new ones, and easy textures.

Good luck, and I hope that you start seeing some health improvements soon. Xxx

#16 Holidayromp

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:16 PM

What you are doing was me.  After years of being vegetarian because of health reasons I needed to switch back to meat.  I was lethargic, anaemic and never felt right.

It took me eight months to get to the point where I could regularly eat meat.  I would eat a little meat every day.  I started with chicken.....KFC!!!! I don't know why but it could have been the grease and spices but I had vomiting sessions if I had too much and then I progressed to red meat and only a little every so often and then I increased the amount.

Once I was fully back eating meat my lethargy went and I went back to full health.  It was hard but it was worth it in the end.

#17 Guest_Maybelle_*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:17 PM

So many replies...thankyou so much!

I am actually sitting here crying at the thought of it all...but I cry at the thought of everything, thanks to how tired I am  ddoh.gif

The main reason I don't eat meat is because I find the thought of it disgusting...chewing on flesh, urgh!  And of course, animal rights issues, but that is not what this thread is about.  

Meat based broths is a great idea, I didn't even think of that.  I can't cook very well, and neither can my husband, so I will be sucking up to my family and asking them to cook for me  cool.gif I will have to build up to cooking myself, obviously, but I am only 37 and it will be a while before I build up to being that much of a grown up  wink.gif

Sunnycat, you are gorgeous...I would love to hang out with you and eat lasagna sometime!

Thankyou for all the suggestions, I really appreciate it.

#18 noi'mnot

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:20 PM

Just try to take it easy. You don't have to start eating everything straight away, do it at your own pace as comfortably as you can. If you find that it doesn't have any health impacts down the track (from what you've said I don't think this is likely, but just in case...) you can always go back to vegetarianism.

If you are confident making some basic veggie soups, perhaps you could start by using some purchased meat stocks in them (like use chicken stock in your pumpkin soup, for example). This might ease you into it a bit more.

Good luck! original.gif

#19 Anemonefish

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:28 PM

Do you really need to start eating meat? My apologies if this is a rude question. As a lifelong vegetarian, I can understand how unpalateable the thought of eating meat can be, and I think if a Dr told me I needed to start eating meat, I'd do everything I could to avoid resorting to that. I've been very anaemic and exhausted after repeated bouts of malaria (it got into my liver and i got malaria 2-3 times a year for a couple of years) and I managed to increase my iron levels using a liquid iron supplement (Floradix), and by drinking orange juice with meals (Vit C increasese iron absorption). Your health issue is probably more complex than that, but as someone who feels that you can be healthy and have enough energy/iron from a vegetarian diet, I just felt I had to ask the question.

#20 FaithHopeLove

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:33 PM

I was vegetarian for a few years and as per pp found mince a good starting point - in a bolognaise sauce. lately i have turkey mince replacing beef - it is a white meat very lean and high in iron.

#21 Guest_Maybelle_*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:47 PM

.

Edited by Maybelle, 27 December 2012 - 09:26 PM.


#22 Avidlearner1

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:57 PM

I would suggest adding half a chicken breast, diced finely into a risotto, or a stirfry, or having burritos with a 50/50 mix of beans and good quality beef mince. I also like fish, so a grilled piece of dory or salmon with lemon is another option. i find fish much easier to tolerate than meat.

Good luck.




#23 *LucyE*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:10 PM

QUOTE
Meat based broths is a great idea, I didn't even think of that. I can't cook very well, and neither can my husband, so I will be sucking up to my family and asking them to cook for me

Broths are very easy to make and while you are feeling so exhausted, it is probably a very nourishing food to have.

This is one of my go-to recipes when we are sick:
Chicken Noodle Soup
It gives instructions to make the broth, but use short cuts - use chicken wings or drumsticks rather than a whole chicken.  It's cheaper and fits in my pots more easily.  The cooked meat can be shredded for a salad or sandwiches the next day, or given to the dog for a treat.  I use the slow cooker on low rather than the stove top.  It keeps it at a low consistent temp without me having to hover.  I chuck the pieces in a colander and pour a full kettle of boiling water over it first.  Then into the slow cooker and proceed with the recipe.  

If you make an extra big batch of broth, you can freeze it in small containers or even freezer bags placed in a container until it is frozen.

You can skip the meat balls if it's too much for you at first because the broth is delicious just with noodles and extra veggies added.

#24 Guest_Maybelle_*

Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:12 PM

I am going to start with broth, thankyou lovely ladies, and mince based meals seem to be the way to go.  I can't deal with cooking it though...can anyone yay or nay on Lite n' Easy?  At least to start with?

#25 Cat People

Posted 22 November 2012 - 01:16 PM

You sound exhausted but what makes you think meat is going to change anything?

I was in a similar situation while pregnant - beyond exhausted, depressed - I didn't realize I had very low iron (I was fine in my first pregnancy and just assumed it wouldn't be a problem).  I was able to get my strength and health good again without eating meat.  A friend was recently in a similar position and received an iron shot and B12 from her doctor and had immediate results.  Have you gone down this route before trying meat?

I'm pretty sure chowing down some meat isn't going to give you any immediate relief physically, and mentally it could be worse.




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