Jump to content

Anyone ever been induced?
What was it like?

  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_- Poppy -_*

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:45 PM

I have developed GD and bub has grown too big and they are going to induce me early because if he goes full term his is probably not going to be able to fit.

Im a bit scared of being induced, I really really wanted a natural birth no drugs.

My questions are:

When you were induced, what did they do? Are you hooked up to an IV or any other kind of drip?

If you are induced is your birth still classed as a natural birth?

Is it a good idea to get an epidural? I have heard being induced is very painfull and scary because you go from 0 - 100 and you dont have time to adjust so its a good idea to get an epidural.

Any other information would be greatly appreciated!

#2 Mrs Lannister

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:48 PM

I was induced with my second. I had the drip and it was quite intense and quick (3hrs , 1st was 14) I had no drugs and it was ok. It was not my worst birth

#3 Duck-o-lah

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:51 PM

I went into labour naturally, but needed a bit of a hurry up, so was induced. I had a syntocin drip, so yes, hooked up to an IV the whole time. In terms of pain relief, I requested an epidural quite early on in the piece, but the MW kept saying it was too early, so I imagine it would be something you could decide as you go.
Good luck original.gif

#4 2 Gorgeous Girls

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:53 PM

I was induced for my first and had my second naturally.

I was induced because my waters had been broken for 4 days with no labour (I was close to term). I went straight on a drip.

I'm not sure whether it's a natural birth. In my second pregnancy it was just about whether it was vaginal or c-section.

If I had another induction I would ask for an epi as soon as they would give me one, in fact it was in my birth plan second time around!

I didn't even really realise I was in labour with my second as the intensity was so much less. When transition hit I thought labour was starting and freaked out about the pain original.gif

I'm not trying to scare you. Just telling you my honest experience. Other people will give you ideas too and there are definitely some people where they didn't feel natural vs induced labour was any different original.gif

Good luck with your impending birth!

#5 laridae

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:54 PM

Yes, I was induced.  They put me on a drip, put monitoring on my belly, broke the rest of my waters (the hind waters broke naturally but they reckoned it was taking to long for labour to start afterwards - so the helped by inducing).
Then they put in the syntocin and it went from whoa to go pretty quickly.

Still classed as a natural birth original.gif

I won't lie, it is very full on, you don't really get much of a break between contractions, and they ramp up very quickly.  I didn't have an epi though.  They did give me the pethadine shot, and in hindsight, I think it would have been better without it.  It just made me very out of it, but still had all the pain.

All over pretty quickly though - induction started about 8 am, DD was out before 2pm.

Edited by laridae, 21 November 2012 - 08:12 PM.

#6 sarahec

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:58 PM

I was in hospital for three days prior to induction, they tried to induce labour through giving me a pessary. Then on the third day they put the drip in. I was in so much pain!! I wanted to die. I had an epi and the rest was fine. Two of my friends were induced about the same time as me and neither had epis or that much pain. I think it depends. My baby was 4.38kg, so a biggish baby.I guess I would classify it as natural? You are hooked to a drip and a machine that monitors the baby so you can't move much. Well I couldn't.From what I remember it was day one pessary to dilate cervix, day 2 balloon catheter to dilate cervix, day 3 doctor broke waters and drip was put in.

#7 Mitis angelam

Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:59 PM

I was induced because DD was 11 days overdue and there was no sign of labour starting spontaneously.

There are different methods of induction; I had my membranes ruptured and a syntocinon drip.  

As I understand it, (I am so not the expert on this stuff), purists will classify a natural birth as one with no interventions, but someone who is induced can - and generally does - have a vaginal birth.

Look, the approach I took to pain relief was, "Don't rule anything out, take it as it comes and see what I need at the time."  I was induced at about 8am, and I had an epidural at about 4pm.  I didn't find the pain unmanageable until about 2pm (when I started using gas), and I didn't find the build up overwhelming or scary.  I did lose the plot a bit after they gave me a shot of pethidine (about 3pm), but I think that was as much to do with the pethidine as anything else.  

I loved my epidural and had no problems or side effects with it; but you need to weigh up for yourself the risks involved.  From my point of view the great benefit was that it didn't just take away the pain, it also gave me back the ability to take in what was going on around me, respond to the people trying to help me, and work with them; from debriefing with my ob and my midwife (separately) later, I believe that without the epidural I would have ended up with an emergency Caesar, just because I was too out of it with the pain/confusion at that point to be able to do anything to help myself.

Oh, I recommend using a TENS - I found it great in the earlier stages before I started with the gas.

#8 -Belinda-

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:02 PM

I was induced with my first due to high BP.
Broke my waters about 9am, went for a big walk and put on the drip about 12. Contractions kicked in at 12.30pm.
Was able to stand up (with drip attached) to rock, have a shower etc.
First 3 hours were OK, next 3 hours were more intense but only used gas for pain relief.
Pushed DD out at 6.30pm, it took about 30 mins.

Waters broke naturally with my second, labour was more painful (posterior) and ended in C-section about 4 hours later when bub became distressed for unknown reasons. Total opposite!

Good luck, you'll be fine.

Edited by -Belinda-, 21 November 2012 - 08:05 PM.

#9 tanyak1

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:03 PM

I was indued with my 1st and 3rd babies.

First - I was about 3cm dialated beforehand (didn't feel anything). The OB recommended I have an epidural straight away as DD was posterior. So I got the epidural put in, syntocin drip started, and waters broken - can't remember the sequence of events but one procedure after the other. I pretty much didn't feel a thing for the 10 hours, the midwives told me when to push. Ended up having a forceps delivery (I think more due to DD's posterior position, she didn't turn).

Second induction/3rd baby - 3cm dialated again. Water was broken and the midwife had me walk around for a bit to try and start labour, nothing happened so after about an hour they started the drip. From first contraction to birth was 2 1/2 hours, it was hard and painful and I used only gas, but I knew I could handle it as I only had gas for (non-induced) DD2. The induced labour was harder and more painful but because it was quick it was not so bad.

#10 Bunbaker

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:04 PM

I was induced with all 3 of my kiddies.
Mainly due to their size and mine. My first was induced 4 days before due date.
I had the gel applied the night before at around 10pm and started getting crampy through the night and then labour began at 9am. I had a 9 hour pretty straight forward labour. I would say it progressed well and steady. I had pethedine with her although didn't like the feeling of that.
I was then induced at 37weeks and 6 days with bub 2 and he was my easiest labour/birth. I had my waters broken and then drip. This was a drug free labour and also steadily progressed.
Baby 3 was induced at 38weeks was 6.5 hours. I was induced with gel and I was in labour within 15mins (before the middy had even left the room lol). Again a drug free labour and fairly straight forward. They had to break my waters at 4cm as they were bulging and this made my contractions very intense and I went from 4cm to 10 in a matter of half an hour. This was very painful but I managed and that really didn't have anything to do with being induced.

Don't believe everyones stories that being induced means it will be more painful or go from 0-100 quickly. It will depend on you and your bub. I am hoping next bub I will go into labour naturally but I cannot go past 38 weeks now so I will be limited time wise.

Good luck and hope all goes smoothly xx

#11 Born Three

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:05 PM

I was induced at 37 weeks for my third pregnancy.

They started off with rupturing my membranes. The assumption was that I would go straight into labour due to two previous, quick births.

After 4 hours nothing had happened so they started me on the drip. The dose was low and increased every 20 minutes. It was gradual and took many hours before I started contracting.

I was on the drip for 6 hours before I started getting strong contractions (5 mins apart, 1 min duration). Baby was born 1.5 hours later.

I didn't use any pain relief.

I was on a monitor the whole time so my mobility was restricted. The monitor was wireless so I could walk around the room with the drip in tow.

Unfortunately I couldn't use the bath or shower for pain relief do that was disappointing.

Due to the slow and steady increase in the drip I didn't go from 0 to 100. The labour didn't differ greatly from previous ones however the sensation was different as it was all artificial not hormonally driven. Pain wise it was more painful but that was probably more to do with the number of stretches I had due to an unfavourable cervix.

I opted for no epidural as I had read there was a higher incidence of further intervention. In the end tho you do what you need to do to get by ... There are no medals handed out for pain relief free births.

#12 Ice Queen

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:05 PM

2 pregnancies and 2 inductions.     Both started with gels on the cervix to get things going and then onto the drip which sets things in motion VERY VERY fast!  On both occasions I called the epi very early, before the drip and before the 'established labour' had actually started.  Small confession......I never even felt labour with DS.  I have read some people on EB saying they were told it was too early for the epi.  My OB was fine with me having it early.  

So IV's, loads of intervention etc etc.  Did I care?  Nah but I was never someone who was all hung up on natural, no pain relief etc, I couldnt have cared less TBH.  Maybe thats why I was happy with both my births, I had no expectations and pretty damm happy to get through fairly pain free.

It is all fine but do your research, discuss the steps with your OB and insist on 'keeping things moving' is my only advice.  Good luck.

#13 MrsMumma

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:06 PM

I was induced a 40w+10. They broke my waters, once there was not action the put the drip in, this got things moving. It is my only labour so I have nothing to compare it with. My labour was 11 hours clinical and probably 13 hours in total from the first contraction to the last, I had an epidural 7 hours in. I delivered a 9'6, prosterior babe with no tears. I dont buy into the whole labour journey... i got a healthy babe in my arms at the end. That is all I care about.

#14 Buggylicious

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:12 PM

I was induced with DS 2 rounds of gels and them an ARM, it wasn't that bad I had a bit of gas and labour lasted 5hrs.

I went in to labour on my own with DD and labour was 2.5hrs the contractions with her were much harder and faster, it still wasn't that bad just some gas once I got to hospital.

#15 AnnBB

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:43 PM

I was induced at 39w 4d as I had GD. My GD was borderline and controlled well with diet. There was some slight concern that DD would be a little chubby so they induced (she wasn't by the way).
When I was induced I was already 3-4 cms and 'ready to go'. I wanted to have my waters broken, be given some time to see if I went into labour on my own. Instead they broke my waters and I was given 30 mins to see what happened before they started the drip. I was kind of pushed into it by the very pushy midwife ( which I had been warned about). If I have to be induced again, I will insist that I be given time to see if I progress naturally without the drip.
If you are on the drip, it is the policy at the hospital where I birthed to have continual monitoring. I wanted to labour standing up rather than on my back and the monitoring made this difficult. The monitoring was a bit of a nightmare actually and really distracting. They eventually agreed to intermittent monitoring rather than continual as DD was doing well.
I describe DD's birth as intense. I went from having my waters broken at 8am, drip at 8.30, labour being established at 9.30am, to DD being in my arms at 11.55am. I had contractions on top of contractions with not much break in between. I was grateful it went quite quick but it seemed that my body crammed the same amount of contractions as a  7 hr labour into 2.5 hrs. I am sure it didnt,but it certainly felt that way!
I was adamant about not having an epidural or pain relief other than gas/ air for the birth. I was worried once it became apparent that I might be induced that that might not be possible as it seems to be fairly widely thought that induced labour is more painful that spontaneous labour. To give myself the best chance at the birth I wanted, I had accupuncture in the weeks leading up to my due date to try to 'ripen' my body or to bring labour on before needing to be induced. I also drank raspberry leaf tea as apparently this can aid with having more effective contractions. I did a calm birth course as well and I found the skills I had practiced useful for the birth.
In the end, I didn't have pain relief besides gas / air at transition. I don't even know if it did anything for me, but I found having to concentrate on breathing with the mouthpiece a distraction which certainly helped. If you really want a birth without drugs, then it certainly is doable. I don't think that just because you are induced that you will end up with an epidural. My advice is to go into it with an open mind and to prepare as much as you can before hand.
Best of luck OP! You will be fine!

#16 imamumto3

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:46 PM

my induced labour was no different to my non induced labour.  both were fast (45 mins & 30 mins).  I used a tens machine all the way through and then gas just before and during the delivery for both.

#17 Starrydawn

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:53 PM

A gel inducd labour would be more like a normal go into labour. It is when you get that drip that it can ramp up fast. Mine went from 0-100 pretty fast. I also had my waters broken. Was constantly monitored. In the end I had a caeserean.

#18 Soontobegran

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:04 PM

I have been induced 5 times, the first one was the only time I needed an epidural and had a forcep delivery.
I required no pain relief for my last 4 and they were all very natural vaginal deliveries....I did have an IV in it did not restrict me in anyway, I was also intermittently monitored.

#19 SusanStoHelit

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:18 PM

Yep, twice for me.
DD1: preeclampsia They used the gel, which was slow and then did ARM. Hooked up to a monitor all the time and 24 hours of labour. DD started showing signs of distress, so they preped me for a caesar but I was in transition anyway so she came out with a couple of pushes and a ventouse (SP?) delivery. (And boy was pushing with the caesar anesthetic in place a wierd feeling!)

DD2: Waters broke, but no sign of labour. I had a high temp, and they thought bubs may have passed some meconium so they wanted to get things moving pretty quickly. I was hooked up to multiple IVs (syntocin, anitbiotics and saline for hydration) and continual monitoring with the bands around your belly, so very limited movement. But she was born only 6 hours after drip started. It is fairly standard practice now (I think) to start the drip at a lower level and gradually increase it to a dose to maintain contractions / labour, which helps avoid the "0-100" feeling. If you're not sure, ask if this is what they are going to do.

Both births were drug free (apart from being preped for DD1, which I wasn't asking for but at the time was medically necessary) and fairly calm. For both, I got them to wheel the foetal monitor over so I could sit and rock on a Swiss ball instead of being confined to bed which really helped (and also put me in a good spot for backrubs and hotpacks from DH!). I had also done yoga throughout pregnancy, and used visualisation / breathing techniques. I found this managed the pain enough that I didn't even feel I needed the drugs. So to answer your question OP, no I don't think an induced labour has to be any more painful than a "normal" one. Cross your fingers for a good midwife, the one I had with DD2 was awesome! That being said, be prepared for medical pain relief if you need it.

#20 Frau Farbissina

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:22 PM

Hi OP, I had GD too and was induced when I was 8 days overdue. Initially, the MW broke my waters, as this can sometimes bring on labour. As it didn't appear to do anything, after about an hour or so, they started the drip. I had to have a cannula in the back of my hand, which TBH was more irksome than the first part of labour! I had also tested positive for strep  B so I think I was going to have to have the cannula anyway.  The labour was quick - about 3 and half hours from start to finish.  As it was my second labour, I knew what was happening and I was able to face it (for want of a better phrase). The contractions did come on a lot more quickly, but the whole event was over a lot faster ,too. (My first labour was something like 18 hours). I got through without any pain relief, and got a second degree tear, which was stitched up and healed fine. Due to the GD and I think also being induced, I had to have a strap around my belly to monitor the baby's heart beat, and the midwife also took BSL readings about every hour. I don't remember this happening in my first labour, when I also had GD, but did have the heartrate monitor on even though it was a spontaneous labour in that case.

GOod luck with it OP  original.gif

#21 SeaPrincess

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:34 PM

I've had 2 inductions with epidurals and 1 spontaneous unmedicated labour.  As far as I'm concerned, if it's a VB, it's natural.
When you were induced, what did they do? Both times, I was induced just by having my waters broken.  My OB used a thing that looked like a condom with a little blade on the end to break the membranes. The first time, it was done in the evening with the plan that if nothing was happening by morning, I'd be put on a drip and given syntocinon to stimulate contractions.  I started having contractions about an hour after my waters were broken and baby was delivered 6.5 hours later (7.5 hours total).  The 2nd time, my OB knew to start me in the morning  biggrin.gif

Are you hooked up to an IV or any other kind of drip? The first time, I wasn't put on a drip until DH requested an epidural.  The 2nd induction (baby #3), after a relatively short first delivery and a 3-hour labour with #2, my OB said I would have to decide ahead of time if I wanted an epidural.  I had it inserted and a test dose put in before my waters were broken, but it had worn off before labour fully established.  Once they give you an epidural, you'll have an IV (usually put in first because the epidural can cause blood pressure to drop).

Is it a good idea to get an epidural? My labours were comparable pain-wise, and with the epidurals, I was still able to walk around, so I could still feel contractions, but they weren't painful. If you have the option, you can see how you go and request one if you need it once you're in labour.

Good luck!

#22 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:40 PM

I was induced at 41 weeks due to high blood pressure and DS leaking meconium. I had planned a water birth at the birth centre.

My induction was good. They did two stretch and sweeps leading up to it but they didn't work. DS was posterior and I was induced with the drip. Unfortunately due to exhaustin and awkwardness of all the things hanging off me I couldn't have an active birth and the hospital didn't have gas for me.

I was doing well but it became too painful and I had barely dialated in 4 hours so I opted for the epidural and within an hour was fully dialated. Also the reason I had the epidural was because DS heart best was irregular and my blood pressure was getting higher so if I ended up needed a csection I wanted to be awake so at least if I had the epidural the thing would already be in.

From start of induction to babe in arms it was 8 and a half hours and no complications.

#23 katrina24

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:56 PM

I think it's important to remember that,even though statistically inductions carry a greater risk of interventions, it doesn't necessarily mean your induced birth will go this way.

I was sort of induced with DD1. I was over due and went in to have the induction. I had a high, closed cervix and no sign of any contractions or even rumblings from my uterus. The plan was gel. In the evening, gel again in the morning, break waters and then syntocin drip.

What actually happened - 1/2 dose of gel. Soon after waters broke naturally, contractions started and DD was born 4 hours later after a relatively easy birth.

I'm not sure on the official definition if a 'natural'birth. It's not a term I use. If the induction went as planned it would be a vaginal

It's never possible to know for sure how birth will progress.  Births that start spontaneously can also end in interventions or a C section.

Best of luck, I hope it all goes well for you.

ETa: my second birth was spontaneous. It was 1/2 as long but just as painful. I didn't have an epidural for either.  Again, I don't think an epi is something that can necessarily be planned.  If I had had difficult of very long births I would very possibly have had one but my births were fast and uncomplicated so I didn't.  I think it would be a better idea to think about when you might request one etc than trying to plan ahead of time.

Edited by katrina24, 21 November 2012 - 09:59 PM.

#24 HurryUpAlready

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:13 PM

I was induced this Feb due to GD. Bub was small but hadn't come by my due date & OB wouldn't let me go overdue.

Because she didn't want to use the gel (too slow?) she wanted to break my waters straight off the bat. Given I wasn't dialated at all, OB said it would be painful & suggested I have an epidural first.

So, I had epi and a drip put in at about 7.30am. Epi worked very quickly. I could still walk but didn't feel it when OB broke my waters.

Contractions started within 10 mins or so but I couldn't feel them to start with, until the epi started to wear off.

I let the epi wear off for a few hours but had it topped up again eventually and DD was born at 4.52pm.

As far as I'm concerned, she came out of my vagina so it was a natural delivery!!!

#25 knottygirl

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:17 PM

I have been induced twice, both with the drip and the gel.

The first time my waters broke, but only the hind waters, and they put me on the drip and ramped it up over the day until it was maxed out.  For some reason it didnt work.  Then the nurse tried to do an internal and i wasnt dilated at all.  then next thing my (fore?) waters broke and i got contractions doubling up like overlapping,and only 1 minute apart.  It was full on to go from nothing to that.  within an hour id asked for the epidural, which the doctor wanted me to have anyway, as he didnt think i would be able to deliver naturally anyway cause ds was a whopper, 9pound 5 and im quite small.  I pushed him out though, no intervention, no forceps or vacuum, and i couldnt even feel the contractions the epidural was maxed out the whole time cause the dr wanted me ready for an emergency caesar in case he got stuck.   i ended up with bad tearing though cause he came out with one arm up in the air.

With the next one i requested an induction at 38 weeks as i was worried that he would be big too.  The scans were inconclusive because of his position.  I had the gel, which was def a slower buildup to contractions, but still not like going into labour naturally.  i asked for an epidural early because it was friday afternoon, during the floods, and i was worried if i left it they might not get anyone in.  plus i knew that i could deliver with an epidural by myself, and i knew i would most likely tear again, as the boys were only 21 months apart.  I know that epidurals have a much higher rate of forceps/episiotomies but second time round that wasnt a concern for me.

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


Newborn baby found in a nativity scene

Police are trying to trace a woman who abandoned a baby boy in the manger of a church nativity scene.

Life would be harder without my kids

The Humans of New York Facebook page is well known for sharing touching, real stories from one of the world's biggest cities – and it's just hit the heart of parents everywhere.

Mum dresses as Wonder Woman for last day of chemo

A Brisbane mum dressed up as a superhero to celebrate the end of her chemotherapy and created a moment her family will remember forever.

How a raisin can predict a toddler's IQ

All you need to assess a child's future intelligence is a plastic cup and a raisin, according to new research.

Former Hi-5 member's cannabis hope

Former Hi-5 star Tim Harding hopes a cannabis-derived drug will help control his daughter's epilepsy, which sees the four-year-old suffering between 50 and 100 seizures a day.

The top 5 reasons your toddler throws a tantrum

Whilst to the outside world little people may appear to have it easy, it's actually not always the case – just ask any toddler who's had their toast cut up the wrong way.

Glenn McGrath thought he'd lost his wife and baby

Australian cricket ledged Glen McGrath has spoken about the moment he thought he might lose his wife, Sara and their baby daughter, Madison.


Inside my Centrelink nightmare

Mother Bec Smith has been trying for months to access Centrelink payments. A "serious error" is preventing her.

Warnings over push for hourly childcare billing

Australia's peak childcare body has called for caution around the Turnbull government's push for childcare centres to charge parents by the hour, not by the day.

Cate Blanchett thought about adopting for years

Cate Blanchett says her recent adoption of a baby girl had nothing to do with wanting a daughter after having three sons.

Kate Walsh: 'I can't have kids'

Grey's Anatomy star Kate Walsh has revealed she is unable to have children because she has experienced early menopause.

The parasite that could boost fertility

The Tsimane women of Bolivia are often revered as among the most fertile in the world - on average having 10 children in their lifetimes -- but some are even more fertile than others.

Family may sue cousin over genetics

A Melbourne couple is suing the Royal Children's Hospital for failing to diagnose a genetic disorder in their first child - an error they allege caused them to have another child with severe disabilities.

Strange things mums have done in labour

While most women in labour focus on the upcoming birth of their baby, some women do more interesting things.

Michael Clarke reveals baby's name

When Michael Clarke said he was wrapped around the finger of his little princess, he wasn't joking.

The logistics of breastfeeding twins

Our life is more or less divided into neat four hour parcels of time and it's hard to get much of anything done in the time between feeds.

How to stop people ruining Christmas

We can make a conscious effort about how we react to those curly Christmas day scenarios that can send us up the wall, or should we say chimney.

Lots of formula offers for desperate mum

The mum who was down to her last three tins of baby formula said she had received hundreds of calls and offers to send her formula.

Surviving breast cancer while pregnant

It was last thing Rebecca O'Donnell expected at 30 weeks' pregnant. One morning, while putting on her bra, she felt a pea-sized lump in her right breast.

Cot sheet brands for the nursery

With so many awesome cot sheet options these days, we thought we'd put together a list of go-to brands for you to seek out for your baby's bed.


What's hot on EB

How I survived breast cancer while pregnant

It was last thing Rebecca O'Donnell expected at 30 weeks' pregnant. One morning, while putting on her bra, she felt a pea-sized lump in her right breast.

Grieving father's letter to Bataclan terrorists: "...this little boy will threaten you by being happy and free"

A grieving father whose wife was killed in the attacks on the Bataclan Theatre last weekend has written an open letter to her killers.

5 challenges of motherhood - and how to see them differently

Despite the smiles, the sloppy kisses and the pure magic children bring to our lives, it's hard to deny that motherhood can be tough.

4 challenges of being a new dad - and how to face them

Becoming a parent is challenging – and that applies to both mums and dads.

My battle against antenatal and postnatal depression

I was five months pregnant when I realised I needed help.

Children swapped at birth will not be returned to biological parents

A boy and girl accidentally swapped on the day they were born will stay with the families who have raised them, a South African court has ruled.

A quarter of men believe they get 'man periods'

A British study has revealed one in four men believe they have a monthly cycle.

Baby deposit

How much do you need to save for a 'baby deposit'?

It's fairly straightforward to calculate a house deposit, but how much money do you need to save up for a baby?

Dad's beautiful note to his wife, a nurse

To anyone else it might just look like a picture of a mum having a nap with her toddler.

'I was a complete schmuck': Mike Baird opens up about his wife's postnatal depression

When his wife Kerryn was not well following the birth of their daughter, NSW Premier Mike Baird buried himself in his work.

Mum's desperate plea as whooping cough alert issued

A desperate mother has shared a heart-breaking video of her baby struggling to cope with a coughing fit caused by pertussis.

Coffee could help you live longer

New US research found people who report drinking three to five cups of coffee a day are less likely to die prematurely from heart disease, suicide, diabetes or Parkinson's disease.

The joy and dread of playdates

To live vicariously through your child is to rediscover anxieties you thought dead and buried.

Sick baby could die without scarce special formula, mum says

Lizzie Cann is down to her last three tins of a special formula in short supply.

Adorable toddler's strop foiled by squeaky shoes

We're probably all familiar with the pouty bottom lip and tightly crossed arms of a tot mid-strop.

More sex during World Cup created more baby boys

More sex during South Africa's World Cup meant a disproportionately high number of boys were born nine months later, a new study has found.

Win one of two ABC Shop prize packs in time for Christmas

What a boon it would be to have your toddler's Christmas gifts covered this year. We have two awesome ABC Shop prize packs to give away to two lucky winners.

Do fitness challenges really work?

Fitness challenges aren't new. There's Michelle Bridges 12WBT and a bunch of other programs if you really want to lose weight.

What are pregnant women Googling?

Pregnancy is a huge change for any woman, so it's natural we'll have questions - and turn to Google to ask them.



Can't decide?

Check out the Essential Baby Names section for some inspiration

Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.