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This is why I support euthanasia


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72 replies to this topic

#1 BetteBoop

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:46 AM

and think Right to Life is an expression that's used ironically by anti euthanasia lobby groups.

Two people are dead because one wanted to end her suffering. The fact that euthanasia is not a personal choice creates criminals out of loving partners.

QUOTE
Erickson had been concerned about the likelihood of receiving an immediate term of imprisonment over the death of his partner.


The full article:
http://www.watoday.com.au/wa-news/mercy-ki...1120-29o21.html

#2 Oriental lily

Posted 21 November 2012 - 09:52 AM

I often think that for how far we have come in human rights, we still live in such barbaric times. sad.gif .

#3 mini mac

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:02 AM

This is such a difficult subject. So many angles to consider.

Working in the health industry, too often I have seen people suffering with terminal illness, disease or sometimes just old age that has taken away any quality of life left... Some of these people have seriously begged to be put out of their suffering.

It's sad, we don't let animals suffer, but a person that can vocalise their pain and wishes has to have a long and often painful ending.

I don't know that I could be the one to delivery that fatal blow to hose patients but if it were my loved one suffering and begging I would have to reconsider.

#4 Fanny McPhail

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:07 AM

That story is just so sad.

Poor poor man. He and his partner deserved so much more.

Just in case it wasn't clear, I also support euthanasia.

I watched my grandmother go from a physically active, busy 78 year old, to a non-verbal, immobilised prisoner in her own body, after a stroke that should have killed her.

She did all the verbal excerises and we would do all the physical stuff with her. Her condition would improve slightly and then she would suffer another mini-stroke and all her progress would be erased.

She lived for 6 years after that first stroke.

I miss her daily but I wish she hadn't have had to suffer as she did.

Edited by Fanny McPhail, 21 November 2012 - 10:20 AM.


#5 ComradeBob

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:12 AM

My understanding is that in countries where euthanasia has been legalised, there is no great jump in the numbers of people choosing it as an option over decent palliative care. What it does provide for many people is a form of insurance that if it all does get too much, they know there is a dignified end that they can choose.

#6 Bluenomi

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:14 AM

Once again I am disgusted that we can treat our pets to a timely death but cannot do it with humans who can vocalise consent.

#7 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:25 AM

That poor man!

How can anyone possibly think that a story like that is more appropriate than allowing people the right to choose the manner of their passing.

#8 noonehere

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:45 AM

I agree! That man was a local who im sure i used to see out and about.

We put animals down its about time that people terminally ill had that choice.

#9 Chelli

Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:54 AM

Such a sad story. I also support euthanasia.

#10 PurpleNess

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:00 AM

Fully Support here, I know when my times comes I'll not be stuck in a hospital hooked up to machines. My family all know this. My mum also has the same wishes...

I put my dog down due to a painful inoperable bone cancer, would do the same for a family member & risk the prison term..

#11 CFMummy

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:03 AM

My Nana is at this point now at 90 years old they want her to have 6 weeks of radiation she refuses as she cant do it all she wants is to die now. She has had a DNR in place for years

#12 archyandmehitabel

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:05 AM

Poor man.  I'm glad his suffering is over.  He did something he never wanted to have to do, and must have suffered terribly when he did it, and all from love ... and we as a society try to punish him for it?

Wonder what the police who charged him thought, and the prosecutor and the judge?  Did they wish it wasn't happening and that it was inhumane to make him suffer more?

I want euthanasia legalised.  I can't imagine being forced to live when it is a misery for me.

#13 Tyfle Hour

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:13 AM

It's a very sad case.  But the man expressed a wish that it not be politicised (ie. used as an argument for legalising euthanasia).  I doubt he would have seen any kind of jail sentence, but he was clearly heartbroken.

I don't agree with the idea of legalising euthanasia.  I'll leave this thread now to avoid the 'if you don't agree with euthanasia, you've obvioulsy never seen anyone you love die a painful death/are a heartless cow' comments that tend to follow that statement.

#14 Feral Becky

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:30 AM

Clever chook I am with you and surprisingly a lot of medical people do feel the same way. I am not any sort of Right to Lifer, in fact am an atheist. The case is very sad but I do think we do have very good palliative care in this country.

Patients at the end of their life get a little morphine pump and they die in a few days. A healthy person would not die of this.

I do realise that I am in the minority and I think about 80% of people support euthanasia original.gif

#15 BetteBoop

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:37 AM

QUOTE (LindsayMK @ 21/11/2012, 11:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I do think we do have very good palliative care in this country.

Patients at the end of their life get a little morphine pump and they die in a few days. A healthy person would not die of this.


I agree that happens. But that's just euthanasia performed under the table.

And as someone who watched her grandmother die of cancer a year ago, I disagree that palliative care is good.

Being drugged to the point of a coma and then death is not quality care in my eyes.

#16 Feral Becky

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:39 AM

That's OK, BetteBoop original.gif

#17 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:47 AM

Why are people against euthanasia?

(Aside from the concerns around sick or elderly being coerced into ending their life).

#18 *Nasty*Squeekums*

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:49 AM

QUOTE (Bluenomi @ 21/11/2012, 10:44 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Once again I am disgusted that we can treat our pets to a timely death but cannot do it with humans who can vocalise consent.

.
So much easier to just quote this.
Agree 110%

#19 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

QUOTE (BetteBoop @ 21/11/2012, 11:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (LindsayMK @ 21/11/2012, 11:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Clever chook I am with you and surprisingly a lot of medical people do feel the same way. I am not any sort of Right to Lifer, in fact am an atheist. The case is very sad but I do think we do have very good palliative care in this country.
Patients at the end of their life get a little morphine pump and they die in a few days. A healthy person would not die of this.
I do realise that I am in the minority and I think about 80% of people support euthanasia original.gif

I agree that happens. But that's just euthanasia performed under the table.

And as someone who watched her grandmother die of cancer a year ago, I disagree that palliative care is good.

Being drugged to the point of a coma and then death is not quality care in my eyes.

I agree.  that's often what happens, at least from what I have seen.  I don't think it's necessarily high quality care.  But I suppose that's as fast as the medical profession can help when individuals are nearing the end.

Even if euthanasia was legalised (and I suspect it won't be, not for a long LONG time), I can't see that many people would take the option to bring forward their death.  There are also many people who are in pain and suffering who want to cling on to every moment of life while they can, to stay with their family and friends for as long as possible.  The people who would opt to use euthanasia would be in the minority I suspect.

#20 jessiesgirl

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:52 AM

Sunnycat isn't that reason enough?  I also think that many people would not be able to choose euthanasia due to mental/cognitive etc limitations which would create a group of people unable to get access to it, marginlising them further in society.

Like LindsayMK, I am an atheist and don't like people thinking all objectors to euthanasia are religious zealots.

#21 Guest_Sunnycat_*

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:56 AM

QUOTE (jessiesgirl @ 21/11/2012, 11:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Sunnycat isn't that reason enough?  I also think that many people would not be able to choose euthanasia due to mental/cognitive etc limitations which would create a group of people unable to get access to it, marginlising them further in society.

Like LindsayMK, I am an atheist and don't like people thinking all objectors to euthanasia are religious zealots.


But what about the countries where euthanasia is legal, do they face the problems with people being coerced into being euthanized?

#22 BetteBoop

Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:57 AM

QUOTE (YodaTheWrinkledOne @ 21/11/2012, 11:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Even if euthanasia was legalised (and I suspect it won't be, not for a long LONG time), I can't see that many people would take the option to bring forward their death.  There are also many people who are in pain and suffering who want to cling on to every moment of life while they can, to stay with their family and friends for as long as possible.  The people who would opt to use euthanasia would be in the minority I suspect.


I agree. The will to live is strong.

My grandmother didn't want to die even though she was in unbearable pain.

But it should be an option for those who want it. It infuriates me that a minority of people get to make the decision for everyone else.

#23 Sweet like a lemon

Posted 21 November 2012 - 12:04 PM

QUOTE (LindsayMK @ 21/11/2012, 12:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Clever chook I am with you and surprisingly a lot of medical people do feel the same way. I am not any sort of Right to Lifer, in fact am an atheist. The case is very sad but I do think we do have very good palliative care in this country.

Patients at the end of their life get a little morphine pump and they die in a few days. A healthy person would not die of this.

I do realise that I am in the minority and I think about 80% of people support euthanasia original.gif


I would suggest you watch:
*Warning. This is quite distressing*
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdxd_EFDd4s
As was with Angelique Flowers, palliative care and pain medication don't necessarily leave you pain free and comfortable. I would also like to highlight that Angelique died the way she feared she would, from complete bowel obstruction. She did not slip peacefully from world while she slept.


#24 jessiesgirl

Posted 21 November 2012 - 12:06 PM

QUOTE (Sunnycat @ 21/11/2012, 11:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But what about the countries where euthanasia is legal, do they face the problems with people being coerced into being euthanized?


I am not sure how this issue could be investigated do you?  "Well Auntie Lizzie told me and me alone that she wanted to die so ...."  Even if you say that a person has to say themselves when clear of mind that they want euthanasia (to avoid that situation), what if they change their mind but are unable to express that? You can't measure that with any kind of survey or anything.

#25 mini mac

Posted 21 November 2012 - 12:11 PM

QUOTE (LindsayMK @ 21/11/2012, 09:30 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Clever chook I am with you and surprisingly a lot of medical people do feel the same way. I am not any sort of Right to Lifer, in fact am an atheist. The case is very sad but I do think we do have very good palliative care in this country.

Patients at the end of their life get a little morphine pump and they die in a few days. A healthy person would not die of this.

I do realise that I am in the minority and I think about 80% of people support euthanasia original.gif


That nearly implicates euthanasia right there... The morphine isn't given to let them die. It's pain relief for the already terminally ill...




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