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Ryde birth centre
Ryde or RNSH?


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#1 MJPURCELL

Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:25 AM

Hi everyone, I am new here. I am 16 weeks pregnant with my first child and had my first visit at the Ryde Midwifrey Clinic last week. I am really happy with the midwife however my concerns are they send you home 4-6 hours after you give birth and there is no option to have an epidural. This worries me greatly. I am thinking of going to RNSH just so I have the option and so I can spend at least a night there. Can anyone else share their experiences? Thanks!

#2 R2B2

Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:42 AM

I have delivered there. you should bring these concerns up with your midwife.

it might be as simple as talking through it with them to put your mind at ease.

if you really don't feel comfortable going home after a short period of time, then defiantly consider other options, but I can assure you that they will not send you home unless you and baby are 100% well and happy.

its an absolutely fantastic environment to birth your little one, but at the end of the day you need to be happy and comfortable with your decision original.gif

I can only speak extremely highly of all the midwives and the model of care!

Edited by R2B2, 20 November 2012 - 08:43 AM.


#3 Natttmumm

Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:00 PM

From what I have heard (not first hand knowledge) I would go to RNSH. I have heard great things from there and not so great from Ryde. As I did say though I havent been to either.

Edited by Natttmumm, 20 November 2012 - 02:00 PM.


#4 Catjinks

Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:19 PM

I went to Ryde, and it was fantastic. I was higher risk so had to deliver at RNS, but that made it more important to have my OWN midwife who I saw throughout my pregnancy. I got a spinal block, even though with Ryde and frankly, it wasn't what I wanted but what my baby and I needed.  Ryde midwives make sure you get what you need to deliver safely.

And it's not like you are sent home to get on with it. The Ryde midwives visit you in your home, which is a much nicer environment to be after the birth. They show you how to care for your baby in your own place, with your own gear. They come out in the middle of the night if you need them too. Ryde midwives take amazing care of new families!

#5 epl0822

Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:23 PM

I asked my GP about going to Ryde when I was pregnant. He said he would be happy to give me a referral if I wanted to go, but he personally would not advise it. You will have midwives at Ryde but no obstetricians. If anything happens to you or your baby you will have to be sent to another hospital, which I didn't want to do half way through labour. My GP also said the midwives at Ryde are all about natural birth, no intervention etc - there is nothing wrong with that if that's what you want, but if you wanted some other options then Ryde is probably not for you.

I really wanted a drug free birth but half way through I got an epidural. I am so unbelievably grateful I had that option. I also appreciated having a few days' stay at the hospital after birth as I had some time to look after a newborn. I had absolutely no clue what to do!

Edited by epl0822, 20 November 2012 - 02:25 PM.


#6 Catjinks

Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:33 PM

At Ryde, and as a higher risk patient ( 0some problems with my placenta) I also had appointments their supervising obstetrician and had some weeks of extra fetal monitoring. It's not an either or option. Ryde midwives listen to their patients preferences, but when push comes to shove, what is needed happens to ensure the best result for mums and babies.

The thing about Ryde is, you receive all the extra care or interventions, IF you need them. Not just to convenience the place or staff you are birthing at / with.

#7 csillag

Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:51 PM

I gave birth to both of my children and planning my 3rd pregnancy in the care of Ryde Midwivery Practice. This team is incredible, they work on a case load basis which means that there is one midwife allocated to the mother during pregnancy, birth and after care. Absolultely fabolous group of people. If you have a low risk pregnancy and want to experience gentle birth this is the best place.  And yes, there is an early release from the hospital, which we enjoyed the most. I wen
t home just 4-5 hours after the birth and we could bond with our baby straight away. Our midwive came to visit us in our home which was a great help.

#8 R2B2

Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:04 PM

i'm not really sure people who haven't gone through the group practice should be commenting on something they don't know about wink.gif

Ryde has a philosophy when it comes to birthing etc. it may not be what some people are used to or want, but that does not make it less of a worthy option.

I can tell you from FIRST HAND experience that in the event of something "going wrong" they DO have people available to deal with whatever situation arrises.

if things don't look to be going well, they have the ability and FORESIGHT to transfer to RNS.

I had a baby that needed resus at birth at Ryde and believe me when I tell you, the midwife handled the situation just as well as my baby born at RNS who needed resus was dealt with.

they have an Obstetrician that overlooks each patients medical care. he is behind the scenes, but he is aware of every patient and makes decisons based on what is best for everyone.

OP at the end of the day it is up to you to decide what you feel is best for you, your body and your baby, but please take advice from someone who is on a third Ryde baby/pregnancy that you are not in the hands of some incapable anti obstetrician, neglect ridden care.

the midwives go above and beyond to make sure EVERYONE is happy, healthy and SAFE.

I have birthed at both Ryde and RNS and would take Ryde over RNS any day.

Edited by R2B2, 20 November 2012 - 03:05 PM.


#9 lucky 2

Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:18 PM

QUOTE
I asked my GP about going to Ryde when I was pregnant. He said he would be happy to give me a referral if I wanted to go, but he personally would not advise it.
My GP also said the midwives at Ryde are all about natural birth, no intervention etc -

Argh, of course they are about labour and birthing and helping a woman to do it in the usual manner, that's what Midwives do, irrespective of the venue, for the women they care for unless they have known problems, develop problems (and need intervention) or have alternate wishes for their labour/birth (ie birth plan).
That's a pretty irresponsible stance for a Medical Practitioner to take with a pregnant women, likely based on ignorance and personal bias.
Sorry to go off thread OP, but that sort of unprofessional rubbish angers me.

#10 R2B2

Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:29 PM

QUOTE (lucky 2 @ 20/11/2012, 04:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Argh, of course they are about labour and birthing and helping a woman to do it in the usual manner, that's what Midwives do, irrespective of the venue, for the women they care for unless they have known problems, develop problems (and need intervention) or have alternate wishes for their labour/birth (ie birth plan).
That's a pretty irresponsible stance for a Medical Practitioner to take with a pregnant women, likely based on ignorance and personal bias.
Sorry to go off thread OP, but that sort of unprofessional rubbish angers me.



I think I  wub.gif you Lucky 2 wink.gif

#11 MJPURCELL

Posted 20 November 2012 - 04:36 PM

Thank you everyone for your replies! Will take it all on board.

#12 4+4

Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:16 PM

My GP also advised that I obtain the services of an Obstetrician for my fourth pregnancy.  Ryde was not even mentioned to me as a possibility.  I had had 3 previous births in NZ with a midwife caring for me for the last two, which resulted in homebirths.  So, I googled and found Mums at Ryde, who are a support group for the Ryde Midwifery Group Practice.  I am so thankful that I decided not to take my GPs advice!

The midwives at Ryde are fantastic!  I am lucky that I had a low risk pregnancy, but I have a friend who, although initially booked in with the Ryde Midwives, ended up having her care transferred to RNSH due to medical problems that arose during her pregnancy.  Her midwife was able to detect that there was a problem, arrange extra tests for her and then arrange for her to see the doctors at RNSH.  She ended up giving birth there, and although her birth was fine, it was a lot different to mine!

I felt totally in control of my pregnancy, labour and birth.  My midwife respected my wishes, and the back up midwife was lovely too.  

I don't think you can go wrong going with Ryde Midwifery Group Practice.  The relationship that you develop with your midwife gives you a great start to your parenting journey!

Edited by 4+4, 20 November 2012 - 05:18 PM.


#13 MamaL

Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:29 PM

I've done things both ways, hospital & birth centre. Going home early was a blessing. You're in your own environment, own bed, using your own bathroom & bonding with your new little family outside the clinical environment. Shift changes, sharing a room with strangers & their families, call bells going off throughout the night, unsettled babies crying & being woken for unnecessary observations 24x7, the list goes on.
I think we're loosing the trust in a women's body to birth. Our bodies were built to do this & not all of us need to be in clinical hospitals to birth. I hate that hospital birthings have become the "normal".
I wish you all the best in what you decide to do. I was given the option of Ryde or RNS & wasn't 100% sold on Ryde until my 2nd midi appointment. I didn't like the decor. I soon realised that I wouldn't be looking at the pictures on the wall or the  bedspread pattern once in full blown labour & I'm glad I made that decision. I've birthed twice there & highly recommend it!!

#14 DyingofLove

Posted 20 November 2012 - 07:18 PM

Agree with what R2B2 has said. Just wanted to add that I birthed at Ryde and found all the midwives who assisted me to be fantastic and very professional. At no stage did I feel disadvantaged by being in a birth centre as opposed to a maternity ward.

With regards to not having epidural as an option, what they do have (supportive midwives who encourage an active labour, birth pools, gas & pethidine if needed) really goes a long way. I was a little worried about this at first but spent a lot of time mentally preparing myself (read books, attended classes etc) and on the day it didn't even cross my mind and I didn't even ask for gas until quite late. If worst came to worst and you really weren't coping and still had ages to go, you could always be transferred to RNS on the day.

We also loved being able to go home the same day and spend our first night as a family in our own bed. I felt physically fine, my baby was fine and we'd been supported through our first couple of feeds so I didn't see any reason to stay and would have hated to send DH away on his own that night.


#15 blencathra

Posted 20 November 2012 - 07:33 PM

Hi there

  I have just become a member to this site as I am really passionate about supporting the model of care that Ryde Midwifery Group Practice offers. I am 36 and have had my daughter (2 ½ yrs) and son (8 m) at Ryde.

  Here are some comments about my positive experiences at Ryde.

  1.       I had my own midwife; delivered both my babies. She was able to meet with me at times that suited me. Rather than slotting into a clinic. She was contactable via mobile for any queries/ anxieties I may have had during the pregnancies. I contacted her when I was going into labour.

  2.       I was provided with education and support about a range of issues including breastfeeding throughout my pregnancies.

  3.       I was able to have water births for both my labours. The advocacy group, ‘Mums@Ryde’ (see their Facebook page or link) purchased these from fundraising.

  4.       Most importantly, I felt empowered to birth naturally. (My pregnancies were considered low risk). The model of care around specialised midwives supported this. I did not have Drs popping in to check on me or tell me what to do.

  5.       For my first pregnancy, a medical condition I suffer from flared up and it was unclear how this would affect my ability to birth naturally. MW referred to the Obstetrician who works in the practice. I was referred to RNSH for a Ob review and attended a clinic there, and got the all clear to continue my care at Ryde.

  On that note, during labour, in an event of an emergency and intervention is required, the midwife calls 000 and an ambulance will take you to RNSH. My husband just reminded me of something my midwife said, ‘Midwives are the experts at normal’… and she would identify much earlier if Obstetric care was required. (as she did in point 5)

  6.       About the 4 hour stay:  I only stayed overnight for my 1st birth. For my second birth, the 4 hour guideline was in place. We did not find this an issue. I actually left after 3 hours. What should be known is that the midwife conducts a home visit within a certain time period. This is awesome part of the model of care. MW provided home visits on both occasions, and her timing was impeccable. She knew what was coming! I was struggling with the discomfort of the milk coming and really benefitted from her one on one support with breastfeeding.

  7.       The birthing Unit is a little worn, and I had no issues with this. There are two large birthing rooms. They have all the things you may need for comfort e.g. cushy seat, music player etc. The environment feels safe and supportive. You get to meet other midwives who may be present for your birth as well as other mums. The practice has a night for expecting mums to learn about a new mum’s birth story. Mums-to-be and new mums can attend a mother’s group on Wednesdays at 11am at the practice.

  8.       Inexpensive..... Ryde Midwifery Group Practice is an awesome public hospital service that does not get enough credit. I do not understand why investing $$$$ and requiring medical intervention is perceived  to be the norm.

  I cannot think about anything negative about my experiences here. I just think it is a shame that women are not aware of the range of birth choices and models of care, and what information women are confronted with may be disempowering. A positive birth experience for a low risk pregnancy does not have to involve a 5 night stay at hospital with hotel-style food and having an obstetrician in waiting.

Edited by lucky 2, 20 November 2012 - 08:12 PM.
r/o potentially identifying initials as per forum guidelines


#16 abi99

Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:18 PM

I birthed both my children at Ryde Hospital. My first is 2.5 years old and the second is 5 months old, so my experience is very recent. I absolutely love the midwife run practice at Ryde and can't recommend it enough. I had the same midwife through both pregnancies which made such a difference to the birth itself as I trusted her implicitly. In the initial stages of my first pregnancy I was apprehensive about not having the option of an epidural, but with the support and preparation of my midwife it wasn't an issue and both labours were drug free.

I had no problem at all with the early discharge as I felt great after both births and wanted to get settled at home. I had my husband and mother around to help at home, and early discharge meant they were able to bond with the baby right from the beginning which was fantastic. If you don't have family around to help out you may prefer a longer hospital stay. However, as my midwife pointed out, newborns are usually quite chilled out and sleep alot for the first few days and then 'wake up' and become restless after a few days, which is when most hospitals discharge you anyway. So you may as well be at home, resting up and settling into your own space whilst your newborn is adjusting to the world.

Also worth mentioning is that you can only birth at Ryde if you're a low risk birth, which the Ryde midwives continually assess. If there is likely to be an issue, mums to be are transferred to Royal North Shore for birth. So, in a nutshell, the midwives at Ryde are very risk averse and primarily concerned with safety.



#17 teatrail

Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:37 PM

Hello,

I had both my children at Ryde. The second pregnancy was a lot more complicated and an obstetrician was involved. I still managed to birth there and am very proud to have had a very gentle water birth (the birth pool is truly amazing as a pain relief option). I wanted to get back there because my first experience had been so overwhelmingly good, something I especially realised when I talked to other mums who went to a big hospital or had a private obstetrician.

To be honest I was very concerned throughout the second pregnancy that I wouldn't be able to stay at Ryde (with my first baby I stayed for two nights there) because we have no support here whatsoever. I was considering going to RNSH after the birth (which is possible). But then I went home after 4 hours and it was the best thing I could do. If something doesn't feel quite right you can ALWAYS call YOUR midwife (by that stage she will know you very well and you will know her too) and she'll be at your home within a very short time. And she will take time to show you everything and talk you through the tiniest concerns you might have. It was so much better to bond with our baby in our own environment. In hindsight I should have gone home with my first one too.

Best of luck!

#18 easybreezy

Posted 25 November 2012 - 11:34 PM

Hi MJPURCELL (btw I know someone of the exact name)!

I gave birth to my 1st son in RNSH and 2nd in Ryde, so thought I really should say something here.

The previous posts summed up the Ryde Midwifery service pretty well so I won't repeat it. I just want to tell you about my experience at RNSH.

I gave birth for the 1st time in 2008. Even though there was pressure from the Ob to get me induced, quite a few machines were used during labour (as a result I couldn't move freely and was forced to half sit/half lie on my back) and the midwives were so busy (doing what I don't know, may be monitoring the machines?) that poor hubby was the only one left to do any real 'caring' work. Still, without any comparison, at the time I thought it was a pretty good labour experience over all.

But then came the postnatal part. I don't know if they have improved now, but they were terrible back then. Every single midwife was so overworked and tired. It took ages for them to show up and when they finally did many of them were hardly in any mood to provide 'care'. Some of them were plain rude. I asked one to help me open a formula bottle (at the hospital's recommendation as my baby had severe jaundice and my milk didn't come in until day 5) while I breastfed, because being a new mum I had to use both hands to hold the position. She opened it and said: "But it's so simple, why can't you do it yourself?"  ohmy.gif That was my treatment 1st day into being a new mum. There was another one who came in in the middle of the night and moved all the furniture around because "there was too much cluttering"... It sounds crazy now but it really happened! I later filed a formal complaint to the hospital and got an apology.

And it's not that I happened to have met all the bad ones because I was there for 2 weeks for my baby's jaundice. I met most of the midwives working in postnatal ward at the time, and can honestly say, you get about 2 or 3 nice ones out of 10. The nicest midwife I had there was actually a student midwife from UTS. Everyday I wished that she'd come, and wished even more that we could just go home. It was such a depressing time...

And I wasn't the only one, the lady staying next to me complained about the midwives refusing to help her change her ice pack down below when it was too painful for her to move.

There was so little help at night I thought I'd be better off being home anyway. And I was proven right the 2nd time around - hubby provided much better care than those 'professionals'.

Now to a happier note, my second birth at Ryde was wonderful. I won't bore you with the details but suffice to say, it was everything I've hoped for.

Best wishes to you and your baby, no matter where you decide to give birth! Best of luck!

#19 MJPURCELL

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:25 PM

Thanks easybreezy! I totally get that Ryde is an awesome place and don't doubt that at all but it's so nice to hear someone's story who has experienced both Ryde & RNSH. Thank you for your well wishes! rolleyes.gif




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