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Spelling... Traditional vs common
Baby names


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#1 IamAuntyA

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:00 PM

Hello All original.gif I am yet to conceive but my partner & I are already discussing names when we hear of one we like. My favourite boys name has always been Rian (Ryan), my partner also like this. We are just having trouble agreeing on how we would spell it if we are one day blessed with a baby boy. I am Irish so we spell it Rian but because most people spell it Ryan should we go with that spelling just to cross out confusion? I've always thought of it as Rian and Ryan just doesn't look right to me  wacko.gif  We have the same problem with Eoin (Owen). I think I would stick with the Gaelic spelling for that one tho  :-)
Thank You for you opinions  biggrin.gif

#2 Cretaceous

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:07 PM

I generally prefer original spellings and while I do prefer Eoin to Owen, for some reason Rian looks to me like a uneek spelling, so I prefer Ryan.


#3 FlamingoG

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:11 PM

Oooh, Rian all the way! I've always loved it, and feel that having an Irish DH makes it much more authentic for me... Love Eoin too!

#4 kerilyntaryn

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:11 PM

I would stick with Ryan and Owen

#5 B.Nasty

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:13 PM

QUOTE (kerilyntaryn @ 19/11/2012, 10:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would stick with Ryan and Owen


Me too.


#6 la di dah

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:20 PM

Eoin would have some trouble getting read correctly at all - Rian, at worst people would get the right sounds but think you can't spell - you would know you could though. I would consider Rian an easier first name to manage than Eoin.

I'd be tempted to say use Owen if a first name and Eoin if a middle name. It's a bit of a compromise but its pragmatic. But if it only looks right to you spelt the traditional way I'd do that, I just personally don't find Owen anywhere near as bloodcurdling as, say, some of the phoneticizations of Siobhan.

#7 IamAuntyA

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:21 PM

QUOTE (kerilyntaryn @ 19/11/2012, 11:11 PM)
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I would stick with Ryan and Owen


For me it wouldn't be 'sticking' to them spellings tho as I grew up in Ireland Rian & Eoin are the ways to spell the names, Owen is unheard of over there but Ryan is starting to become more popular. I think with Ryan I like the idea of not having to spell it out & not explain why it's spelt Rian. It's hard to convert haha :-)

#8 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:22 PM

QUOTE (kerilyntaryn @ 19/11/2012, 10:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I would stick with Ryan and Owen

same here, but that's purely because that's what I grew up with.  If you grew up with Rian and Eoin, then that's your version of "normal" spelling.

If you are planning to stay in Australia for a long time, I would stick with Ryan and Owen.  Easier spelling.

#9 nasty roses

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:30 PM

I would spell them the Irish way. You're Irish; that's your right!

Seriously, I would. Perhaps some people would think you've used uneek spelling. But you'd know you haven't.

BTW, I've got a Saoirse in my class at school. I'd never come across that name before and it took me a few goes to pronounce it correctly. But I do pronounce it correctly now. And, interestingly, the kids all took to it very easily (she's a new student).

Just think how unfortunate it would be if someone tried to Australianise the spelling of such a beautiful Irish name? Just so people would know how to pronounce it?

Nah, stick to your spelling  original.gif

#10 skylark

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:30 PM

Ryan here comes from the surname version, which has been Ryan for a very, very long time. If you are planning to raise your child in Australia then I would personally go with Ryan and Owen. I am biased though, as my very irish grandpa was called Owen, so clearly that spelling is not "unheard of" in Ireland.

Edited by skylark, 19 November 2012 - 10:32 PM.


#11 Born Slippy

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:34 PM

I'm Australian born with Irish parents, so I can see both sides of this.

I think go with what you are most comfortable choosing. Neither Rian or Eoin are particularly 'difficult' Gaelic spellings and people will learn. You have a genuine link to them and they are the 'normal' version, for you.

Names like Niamh and Siobhan have gained popularity, even with traditional spellings...

#12 Jaffacakes

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:50 PM

I would actually pronounce Eoin as Ian (ee-un). I know a few people with their name spelt and pronounced this way.

I would pronounce Rian and Ryan the same way, but if asked to write the name down would automatically presume the Ryan spelling.

#13 Gudrun

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:12 PM

In both these cases I prefer the Irish spelling and that is what I would choose without question.

#14 ~shannon~

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:23 PM

I also thought Eoin was pronounced like Ian.

I much prefer Ryan and Owen (somewhat biased though as my brother is Ryan).

I would assume that Rian is pronounced Ree-arn because that is how it is pronounced in Afrikaans (DH's heritage)... we know a couple of boys with this name.


#15 Monroe

Posted 20 November 2012 - 06:47 AM

You're Irish! Go for it.
I love Rian, though Eoin/Owen is okay.

#16 Ianthe

Posted 20 November 2012 - 06:51 AM

I really like the traditional spelling of Eoin but Rian looks wrong to me.

#17 Feral-as-Meggs

Posted 20 November 2012 - 07:00 AM

I would go with Ryan but Im a big chicken and have a Rory not a Ruaidri.

#18 darraghsmam

Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:31 PM

I would go with what feels right for you.I'm Irish and my children have Irish names (Darragh,Saoirse and Tadhg) spelt the traditional way as it meant alot alot to me.

#19 Hedgoth

Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:45 PM

QUOTE
I would go with what feels right for you.I'm Irish and my children have Irish names (Darragh,Saoirse and Tadhg) spelt the traditional way as it meant alot alot to me.


This definitely. It always does my head in how people think names should be spelt a certain way, because you're in Australia. Of course we should all call our children 'Stralian names..Funnily enough i think you'll find most names have their origin from outside of Australia, thank god.







#20 Bel Rowley

Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:47 PM

Having known both a Rian and an Eoin (which was pronounced like Ian rather than Owen) I don't really have a problem with either version.

#21 emlis22

Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:54 PM

I went to primary school with a Rian. I thought it was a 'funny' spelling.

Eoin I think is fine.

Go with what you like original.gif

#22 Prioritising Pooks

Posted 22 November 2012 - 04:07 PM

I think people can cope with unusual spellings. Having said that, I Anglicised my Dad's name for DS's MN because it would make his life easier, as he already has a long last name, I didn't want it to take him half an hour to give his name over the phone. But Rian and Eoin are short and sweet. I actually much prefer the look of Rian, Eoin has me going "Ee-oh-in" in my head but heck, I think people could catch on ok.

#23 cinnabubble

Posted 22 November 2012 - 04:17 PM

In my head, I'm reading it REEan.

#24 Bam1

Posted 24 November 2012 - 03:17 PM

QUOTE (Sassy Girl @ 22/11/2012, 05:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you are Irish I'd stick with the Irish spelling to reflect your heritage. I'm of Welsh origin, my name and those of my DDs look made up but are real Welsh names.

Australia is supposed to be a multicultural society so why should you deny your cultural background just so people find the names easier to pronounce.


I agree and would go further and say that even if you had no celtic stock and preferred Rian to Ryan, then go for it. Although personally having to explain pronunciation for a name that is not my heritage would annoy me so i would not do it (on purpose).

#25 vintage.blue

Posted 24 November 2012 - 03:21 PM

In this case I would use Ryan. It would annoy me too much to have to explain it all the time! A friend of mine is Irish and her son is Rhyan (assume it's an Irish spelling too??) and everyone keeps asking her why she didn't spell it Ryan. It would drive me batty!




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