Jump to content

Planning for retirement?


  • Please log in to reply
33 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_bottle~rocket_*

Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:53 PM

I know I could have posted this in "managing money" but it is a broad kind of question than a specific money issue.

Now that the pension age is being raised to 67, I have started to think about retirement and how to plan for that. I went to a seminar in which it was said that something like 88% of people retire earlier than planned, for a variety of reasons including redundancy, ill health and having to care for elderly relatives.

Ideally I would like us to choose to retire at age 60 but I think we will need some sort of strategy if there is any chance of that happening.

Has anyone else started thinking about this (I realise the EB demographic might be a bit young!)

If so when do you want to retire?
Would you and your partner retire at the same time?
Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?
WDYT about the whole issue?

Edited by bottle~rocket, 14 November 2012 - 09:53 PM.


#2 *LucyE*

Posted 14 November 2012 - 10:10 PM

If so when do you want to retire?
DH is planning on semi retirement by our mid to late 40's.  I am currently a SAHM and intend on some sort of 'career' after I've shipped the kids off to boarding school laugh.gif  

Seriously though, I doubt either of us will ever stop work.  We will always stay active and useful in some way.

Would you and your partner retire at the same time?
Sort of.  We want to do a lot of traveling together.  These days, we don't have to be in the one place to 'work'.  He will probably spend a lot of his life in 'semi retirement' while I'll probably spend the same time working part time.  It's all a matter of perspectives.

Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?
Working like crazy now?  biggrin.gif

WDYT about the whole issue?
I think many people are under prepared for retirement.

#3 Overtherainbow

Posted 14 November 2012 - 11:33 PM

If so when do you want to retire?
I work with a wonderful lady in her late 60's.  She knows so much about our career and is as bright as a button.  I have spoken with her and she agrees that working in a career she loves and is passionate about, keeps her young.  I want to be her.  Still working part time up until 70 but only if I still love my job and am contributing.  If I stop learning, I want out earlier.

Would you and your partner retire at the same time?
Who knows?  I had time off when the kids were babies and DH is older than me.  If it's viable financially and it's what he wants, I have no issue if he retires first.

Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?
We have put extra super aside.  We are working on debt reduction and we have looked at number of years post kids when we can really hit saving.  Knowing the impact of investing long term we have been putting aside for the future but not a lot.

WDYT about the whole issue?

I am frustrated with peoples attitudes towards retirement (MIL and FIL).  That whole attitude of spend super with no frugality and then jump on the pension is just wrong to me.  I understand those who are older will not have super for long term but retiring early and spending your super quickly is not sensible either.

I think most of us are so focussed on today, we forget to plan for tomorrow.


#4 JRA

Posted 15 November 2012 - 07:48 AM

I think the pension age is less of the issue, but more when you can get your super. The pension is becoming more and more of a "only if you have nothing", it is far from the norm for people.

DH will be nearly 60 when DS finishes school, at that stage certainly neither of us will be working. We are both meant to be only doing minimal work now, but I seem to have ruined that and am working too much.

When this project finishes I intend to go back to a lot less work.

Yes we have saved, not necessarily "for retirement" but for life.


#5 MintyBiscuit

Posted 15 November 2012 - 08:02 AM

DH and I have thought about it and discussed it a little, although I think I've thought about it more because I've worked in super and had a bit more exposure to how important super and investments will be for our generation.

We haven't discussed specific ages because I don't think you know until you get there. I don't think DH will ever completely retire because he likes to be busy. Even in our pipe dream discussions where we win $40 million lotto draws he still sees himself working part time. I'm a SAHM and probably will be for many years to come, ideally combined with some sort of volunteering work once I have more time during the day, so I don't really think about retirement in terms of leaving work at the moment. If and when I return to paid work I'll probably think about it more.

From a financial point of view, we have a plan that's not so much just aimed at retirement, but more aimed at work income not being our only source of income. We're on track to pay off our mortgage pretty quickly, and in the next few years we'll be looking into investment options to help set us up.

#6 tothebeach

Posted 15 November 2012 - 08:35 AM

QUOTE
Yes we have saved, not necessarily "for retirement" but for life.

We have the same strategy as JRA.  We are very focussed on savings and investment and live much more modestly than our income allows.  This will enable us to choose our retirement age or to work in stop starts through our life.   I imagine that DH and I will be doing some sort of work till quite old so keep active and engaged.  However, this will be interspersed with periods of semi-retirement, not working etc.   For example, next year we are both planning on taking the year off work to spend more time with the kids.  

We are in our 40s and have enough moneysaved to retire now but our lifestyle would have to be severly curtailed and there is no reason for us to do this.

#7 MrsLexiK

Posted 15 November 2012 - 09:52 AM

[If so when do you want to retire?
I don't know if I ever want to fully retire.  We have plenty of clients that are in their late 60's early 70's still working.  I'd probably like to do part time work.  I suppose when I can no longer function at work.

Would you and your partner retire at the same time?
Probably not, if we were closer in age then maybe but I'll only be in my 50's when he is 67.  If he stays in the same physical field he would retire by the age of 67.  However if he moved to a different area, or managed his own shop I could see him working into his 70s as well.  

Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?
Not really, we have a mortgage at the moment, by the time it is paid off I will still have at lest 20 years of work behind me in which case we could invest more money into our super or into investments or into property.  The house we have will "do" us forever we would only move if we were going to be mortgage free OR be mortgage free on the principal house but have a mortgage on an investment place (our house rented out would bring in more than the mortgage is for instance.)  

Our plan is that we will buy into a retirment villiage or a smaller unit or townhouse when we are ready and the house we have now could be rented (which would have no mortgage on it by that stage)

WDYT about the whole issue?
I am glad we brought when we did, as it still gives us 20 years plus to purchase and pay off an investment property which we could then live off when we are older.  We'd then have 2 houses to be able to sell and or rent out.  That is assuming that neither of us get an inheritance, that neither of us further our studies and therefor our earning potential etc. I'm only 24 and want to go back to study, if that happens and we will be able to afford an investment property earlier then in 20 years.  Giving us more options.

Edited by MrsLexiK, 15 November 2012 - 09:56 AM.


#8 CharliMarley

Posted 15 November 2012 - 10:04 AM

I am one of the "not so young" people on EB and we have been through this. Because my husband was not in the era where superannuation was paid to the worker, until the last 20 years of his employment, he didn't get the full benefit. I was a SAHM until my youngest turned 18 and then I went back to work part-time and eventually full time, but again I was not able to avail myself of a big super pay-out, because of the time limit I was working, which was 17 years - so not enough money to keep me living until 85 or so. The money has run out for me and we are now adjusting our money by my husband paying all the bills, because he has more money than me and if we live too long, we may have to look at a reverse mortgage. The older people who will retire within the next 5 years, just haven't had the time to boost their super payment to live without the pension. cry1.gif

#9 emmafg

Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:09 PM

QUOTE
We have the same strategy as JRA. We are very focussed on savings and investment and live much more modestly than our income allows. This will enable us to choose our retirement age or to work in stop starts through our life. I imagine that DH and I will be doing some sort of work till quite old so keep active and engaged. However, this will be interspersed with periods of semi-retirement, not working etc. For example, next year we are both planning on taking the year off work to spend more time with the kids.

We are in our 40s and have enough moneysaved to retire now but our lifestyle would have to be severly curtailed and there is no reason for us to do this.


This is mostly us, though we are still in our thirties.  DH and I are not planning to ever retire, only stopping work when we are physically unable to.  We enjoy working and staying active (mentally and physically).  We are planning to have several stages of work as we get older, and will probably change careers multiple times over the next 40 years or so.  

My inlaws are both retired at 60, mentally and physically fit, and plan on doing bugger all for the next 20 years.   Partly self funded, partly funded by PS pension.   Each to their own but I just could not do it.

My step mother is 70 and still works full time as a child psychologist.  She has plenty of funds but plans to just keep going until she can't anymore.  



#10 Guest_bottle~rocket_*

Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:53 AM

QUOTE (tothebeach @ 15/11/2012, 09:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We have the same strategy as JRA.  We are very focussed on savings and investment and live much more modestly than our income allows.  This will enable us to choose our retirement age or to work in stop starts through our life.   I imagine that DH and I will be doing some sort of work till quite old so keep active and engaged.  However, this will be interspersed with periods of semi-retirement, not working etc.   For example, next year we are both planning on taking the year off work to spend more time with the kids.


I guess this what I see as being important - having enough savings that if we are forced to retire early for whatever reason, that we will have enough to live comfortably.  

If we are able to keep working into old age on terms that suit us and then only give up work when we want to, that would be ideal.  However in reality many people do not have this option.  Age discrimination in employment is still pretty entrenched unfortunately. I think it is a good idea to be prepared financially in case this is not possible.

#11 Bel Rowley

Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:58 AM

QUOTE (tothebeach @ 15/11/2012, 09:35 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We have the same strategy as JRA.  We are very focussed on savings and investment and live much more modestly than our income allows.  This will enable us to choose our retirement age or to work in stop starts through our life.   I imagine that DH and I will be doing some sort of work till quite old so keep active and engaged.  However, this will be interspersed with periods of semi-retirement, not working etc.   For example, next year we are both planning on taking the year off work to spend more time with the kids.

We are in a similar situation, except that we have been living on DH's income only for the last 4 years while I study and care for our children. We try very hard to save and invest, and DH's goal is to retire by about 50. I will believe it when I see it, but that's what he says for now. Meanwhile I am 34 and have not even started my career, so I will be in no rush to retire, I look forward to working in some capacity for many years. It will be nice if we're in a position where I can pick and choose work opportunities because we won't actually need my income.

#12 Chasing*Rainbows

Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:08 AM

When do you want to retire?

DP originally planned to be retired by 50 but his ex wife took care of that when she wiped out 70% of his super and 70% of his assets. Now we're together we're planning on both retiring when he turns 60, 14 years away.

Would you and your partner retire at the same ago?

Yep as we're planning on travelling around we'll both retire when he gives up work.

Do you have a strategy for planning for retirement?

We have our house, our investment property and an apartment in Europe which is vacant most of the year and kept for family when the visit home. The apartment in Europe we picked up for $30000 AUD 6 years ago and it has already tripled in price as a result of the economy starting to pick up there after the war. Our plan is to sell both the houses and the apartment and live off this for our retirement as well as our super. At the moment though we're both working our butts off to pay for the 2 houses here so it seems like a long way off.

WDYT out the whole issue.

I agree with a previous poster that many people are unprepared for retirement. As hard as it is now to make ends meet I love knowing that the struggles will be worth it in the end and that one day DP and I will be able to travel and live life knowing we'll be okay. I watch my grandfather who's 75 struggle to survive on the pension (still doing seasonal work in 40 degrees plus to make a little extra money to pay the bills) and it breaks my heart.

#13 lozoodle

Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:13 AM

Yes we are looking to retire as early as possible! At the moment our only real planning has been paying a little extra into super, getting some diversity happening with investments, and also buying a few investment properties with the aim of having them paid off by retirement so an extra income stream there from rental income.

Aside from that, we'll see.

I honestly think that full retirement would be a bit boring too early for us, unless we were rich which I don't see happening. So maybe a move to part time work for both of us would be the gradual transition first.

#14 No girls here

Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:21 AM

Yes we have started thinking about it and I've done a number of calcs to look at what our income would be

If so when do you want to retire?
DH wants to retire at 60.  Not sure when I want to yet.

Would you and your partner retire at the same time?
No, DH is 6 years older and so I'd only be 54.  We do want to travel when he hits retirement though, so I'd definitely be taking some time out from working then.

Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?
DH is lucky to be in a very generous government scheme which provides a pension, and it also has a spouse reversion if anything happens to him.  He's contributed at a rate to maximise his pension at retirement and I think we will be quite comfortable.  My super is minimal and will only be spending/travelling money.

WDYT about the whole issue?
The whole lump sum thing would worry me, and if we didn't have the pension, I would definitely be planning on working longer.

Edited by No girls here, 16 November 2012 - 10:28 AM.


#15 threeinnyc

Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:56 AM

I don't think we will ever retire per se. Once DS is older enough to look after himself I (just like my mum or MIL), will go back to work part time. No rest for the wicked!

Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?

Yes. We have savings and investments (including properties).




#16 Freddie'sMum

Posted 16 November 2012 - 12:04 PM

I'm ashamed to say that "no" DH & I haven't really sat down together and thought about retirement.

We have a mortgage on our house - with a 30 year loan - which means we will be in our early 70s when we actually pay the mortgage off  ph34r.gif

I think we are like a lot of people out there - just struggling to pay the day to day bills - and put retirement (saving / thinking about retirement) in the 'too hard' basket.

I do believe that neither of us will be eligible for any kind of Govt assistance (ie we won't get a pension from the Govt) - I simply feel that as the population ages, they will tighten the purse strings more and more.





#17 cesca

Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:42 PM

We've never planned for retirement.  I guess we'll probably have our house, and maybe a second or third house that could bring in an income by then, but I dunno.

We both don't enjoy working and would happily retire tomorrow if we could!

We have no superannuation schemes, so it will be just the pension for us, which I think should be fine for our expenses.

#18 kpingitquiet

Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:04 PM

I hope to keep working til I'm 70 or so. Luckily, my career plan has no real retirement age other than "Dead". The kind of work I'm aiming for is not terribly physical and can be done in a part-time capacity and with lots of time off in later years, so that's all good as long as my brain keeps working well. My soon-to-be-70 stepdad is doing it quite easily, in a similar field, and enjoying it to bits.

My husband will probably opt to retire about the same time I do, depending on where his career goes. He'll be in his early 60s.

Sure, there's Super and/or Pension here and Soc Sec in the US but there are other things. All of my parents have provided well for their own eldercare needs and personal retirement so at least I don't have to worry about financial stress of supporting my parents as they grow old.

My father bought a condo several years back as an investment property and worked up a legal trust type deal so it goes to me in the unhappy event of his passing. We're planning to do some small-scale property investing ourselves, but plan to focus more on private retirement funds, mutual funds, etc. We'll really start working on retirement savings/investment after we finish having kids (one more year or so, fingers crossed) and have funded their education as best we can, along with paying off the house we're in at the time. Then it's on to paying into retirement, big time. With the house paid off, kids educated, etc, our expenses won't be terribly high but we want as much excess as possible for mass amounts of travel.

#19 claptrap

Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:21 PM

There are a couple of things that really stand out to me in this thread.  I think it's fantastic to see so many obviously part of couples working as a great team together, who share goals and work cooperatively towards the common good.

However I didn't see much mention of funding other aspects associated with retirement; namely, there's lots of talk about living well and travelling but what about paying for nursing home care? What happens if illness strikes incurring substantial medical costs? What about when it's health issues that intervene, preventing people from working into their 70's?

Not to mention the issue of marriages failing when children are in early adulthood - often women in this situation are left asset rich and cash poor.

Sorry - I'm in a bit of a budgeting related depression today sad.gif

#20 YodaTheWrinkledOne

Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:23 PM


If so when do you want to retire?
Barring unforseen events or illness, we are hoping to go part-time in our early 60's.  And maybe stay part-time for 10-15 years (2-3 days/week), depending on how we go.  DH and I are in office-based jobs, so it's more do-able for us than it would be for someone who does manual labour.  I think many industries will be more receptive to part-time older workers in 20 years time.  Basically because they will have no choice!  biggrin.gif

Would you and your partner retire at the same time?
There is only one years difference between DH and I, so I think we will retire around the same time.

Do you have a strategy for saving for retirement?
Not specifically.  My superannuation scheme is quite good, so it's accumulating well.  DH has never added more to his super and it's quite pathetic.  We have been talking about making regular voluntary contributions to boost it up, so we will probably do that in the next couple of years.  Plus, we plan to have paid off our home - that's a priority for the next decade.  And buy some shares.

WDYT about the whole issue?
I am concerned that by the time I am in my 60's, the govt pension will be next to useless, so no way do we want to rely on that as a backstop.  Also, I expect that I will easily excedd 80 yo, even 90 years old, so need to ensure that our super and savings is enough to cover that period of time.  I do think many people will be under-prepared.  

And given that we have a serious financial shake-up every 20-30 years, I think most people should expect that their savings and investment will take a dive before they eventually retire and they need to plan for that.  From what I have heard, the GFC has hit some recent retirees quite hard and has made some come out of retirement or make some serious changes to their plans. I don't want to be in that situation when I am nearing retirement.  DH is pretty frugal, so we are hoping that we can plan well.

#21 Tigerdog

Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:40 PM

I would love to retire at age 60 and could probably do so financially (although it is a bit early to tell, anything could happen in the next 25 years!) but I don't think I could fill in all that time, I'd rather work to remain active and mentally challenged.

#22 NotBitzerMaloney

Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:40 PM

We'll be 60 when DD finishes school. By then we should own our house and an investment property, along with super (survival level, not go crazy necessarily)

Our plan is to then buy the place we will move into after we move out of the family home, have it as an investment property for say 5 years / till DD moves out and contribute the maximum to super that we can.

We will then sell the house and have the cash from that to live off and defer touching super for as long as possible. Given I know how much cash you can burn through in your last couple of years on the planet, I'm hoping to have funds for at home nursing for as long as possible.

Hoping to work part time forever. DH's dad is working at age 80 as is mine at 70, so no plans to retire at fifty or anything.

We're both contributing 12% to super from next year.

#23 JRA

Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:23 PM

QUOTE (dogged @ 16/11/2012, 04:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There are a couple of things that really stand out to me in this thread.  I think it's fantastic to see so many obviously part of couples working as a great team together, who share goals and work cooperatively towards the common good.

However I didn't see much mention of funding other aspects associated with retirement; namely, there's lots of talk about living well and travelling but what about paying for nursing home care? What happens if illness strikes incurring substantial medical costs? What about when it's health issues that intervene, preventing people from working into their 70's?

Not to mention the issue of marriages failing when children are in early adulthood - often women in this situation are left asset rich and cash poor.


If our marriage fails when DS is in adulthood we will both be 60+.

As for the other bit, I see planning for retirement including what we can see as costs, and sadly that may include nursing home care

#24 tothebeach

Posted 16 November 2012 - 07:48 PM

QUOTE
As for the other bit, I see planning for retirement including what we can see as costs, and sadly that may include nursing home care

Yes, I agree.  Part of the reason that we are saving so hard is that we don't intend to be a burden to our children (or the government).  We will largely be able to self-fund.  I do see friends who do not have this focus (largely because they expect to inherit which will solve their retirement woes) and it enables them a much more extravegant lifestyle than what we have.

And while I don't expect marriage failure, I have a career and I am able to continue working to accumulate superannuation and investments after our assets have been split.

Edited by tothebeach, 16 November 2012 - 07:50 PM.


#25 Mishu

Posted 16 November 2012 - 08:16 PM

DH is 9 years older than me, so he will be retiring before I do. But we have been talking about our retirement plans over the last couple of years, probably since I turned 40. DH plans to work until he is 60, and then maybemove to part-time or semi-retirement while DS (his step-son) is in high school, so he will be there after school for DS, with sporting events etc. I have gone part-time this year and probably will work flexibly for a while yet, but I imagine I have another 10 -15 years ahead of me of work, at least.

Retirement plans - well, we are looking after our  super (I'm fortunate, I have a very healthy super fund, esp for a woman). We'll have paid off both our homes (his we live in, mine is an investment) by retirement, so one will provide an income stream. We are considering buying another investment in the next couple of years, to either sell to help DS buy a home one day or to fund any moves we might need, such as into a retirement home. Though to be honest, if we sold DH's house (our residential home) we'd be set from a financial perspective to move into some type of retirement living. I'm also already saving to pay for DS's education in high school, potentially private, so that will (hopefully) be covered.

We are both looking after our health, not just from a diet/exercise perspective. DH has already had knee surgery, to prevent problems when he gets older. I don't think you can plan everything that might happen, but we do intend to travel when we retire, enjoy ourselves and continue to live in the area we moved to recently. This is our 'ever after' location.

I don't expect our marriage to fail, having already been divorced, I know what the cost is, emotionally and financially, so we take care of our relationship. But we have also discussed that possibility, and we are both clear on what would happen.

I will say, I'm am probably the only one of my friends that is thinking about retirement, I would guess. We all had children later (mid 30's on) and most are still in the childcare/starting school phase. But I would say that I'm the only one that has really thought about retirement, probably b/c my DH is older than their husbands. But again, I'm probably the only one that is concerned about her super - some SAHM's I know will be relying on their husband's super in retirement. Being divorced, this line of thought scares me, but then, who am I to say my fears are realistic. I think I am slightly jaded.

I would be ok on my own in retirement. DH and I together will be just fine. Financial comfort is important, but I am glad I have someone who I will enjoy growing old with - that is the most important thing to me.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

How I learnt to relax about routines

After many routine-led, tough years, we've realised that being parenting isn't about being perfect. It isn't about following a schedule to a T.

Should you have a third child or not?

I thought our family had been complete with our two boys. I had no idea how much I needed my daughter until she was here.

Helping a toddler embrace an adopted sibling

A single parent by choice, I am preparing to adopt a second baby from Morocco. And I face a special challenge.

When pregnancy messes with your self-esteem

Pregnancy doesn't make all women feel beautiful. It certainly doesn't raise every woman's self-esteem.

Join us in The BIG nappy change

Introducing the new Coles Little Explorer Nappies! You can confidently rely on Coles Little Explorer nappies at each stage of your child's growth, so take the Big Nappy Change and try new Coles Little Explorer nappies for yourself!

Robbie Williams live tweets wife's labour

And the award for most patient woman in labour goes to ... Robbie Williams' wife, Ayda Field.

Vaccine ignorance is deadly and contagious

In the absence of credible, strong political leadership, paranoia about disease can go viral.

Parenting differently based on birth order

All children have unique personalities, but keeping birth order in mind could help when parenting.

How to get rid of the mum guilt

Motherhood and guilt seem to go hand in hand, but there are ways to focus

Paid parental leave scheme grinds to a halt

The future of Prime Minister Tony Abbott's paid parental leave scheme appears to be up in the air, despite the fact it is due to begin in less than nine months.

The devastation of foetal alcohol spectrum disorders

No one's sure how many Australians are affected by foetal alcohol spectrum disorders, but the consequences for those who are can be devastating.

The pros and cons of finding out the sex of your unborn baby

It’s often one of the biggest choices parents make during the course of their pregnancy; to find out, or not to find out, the sex of their baby before it’s born.

Toddler's awesome dress up month

Two-year-old Willow and her photographer mum, Gina Lee, made October "Dress Up Willow Month". She posted photos of Willow's costumes on her Instagram account, and her creative takes on popular culture are simply adorable.

Childhood around the world

It can be easy to assume our ideas around childhood are universal, but they are particular to where we live, as these practices show.

Best picks for baby and toddler shoes

Here's a great selection of footwear from pre-walker to walker ensuring comfort and style for growing feet.

I lost my wife and daughters to Ebola - then it came for my son

Sunday, September 21, is a day I will never forget.

The 'yucky' illness that took over my life

I have a chronic illness nobody likes to discuss. It involves toilet talk, and probably caused my miscarriage. But it needs to be talked about.

Prenatal testing: the facts

Prenatal testing is done to check if a baby has certain medical conditions before birth. Here is some important information about what the tests are for and the risks involved.

5 things to do with your baby?s old clothes

Did you think your only option for your baby?s old clothes was to pack them away or give them to the Salvos? Think again.

Why it's possible to not realise you're pregnant until the baby arrives

After hearing about 'surprise babies' born to mums who didn't know they were pregnant, it's common to ask "how did she not realise?" But experts say it's entirely possible for it to happen.

'My miracle is finally here'

How has the world continued on its pace when mine has been altered so drastically?

Dairy can help older women fall pregnant: study

Ice cream may be the ultimate comfort food, but a study suggests it could also help older women to have children.

Megan Gale goes topless for 'sexiest people' cover

Six months after a heavily pregnant Megan Gale posed nude for Marie Claire, the glowing new mum has gone topless for the cover of another magazine.

A new perspective on life from living with two diseases

A mother shares her personal story about the difficulty of living with two conditions, one of which stops her from being able to see her daughter's face.

Warning about Children's Panadol dosage

The Therapeutic Goods Administration has issued a safety advisory warning parents about confusion when using the dosing syringe supplied with Children's Panadol.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Take 'The Coles Big Nappy Change' Challenge

You could become part of our Test Drive team and win one of 200 packs of Coles Little Explorer Nappies as part of our 5-day challenge.

Win 1 of 5 Canon Powershot D30 cameras

Capture life more easily with the Canon Powershot D30. Shockproof, waterproof and dustproof, you can take it almost anywhere and shoot beautiful images, time after time. Enter now!

16 parenting truths you won't find in the baby books

I am five years into this parenting gig and I’ve learnt that sleepless nights and changing dirty nappies are child’s play.

Best and worst potty party cakes

It's nice to celebrate a child making the shift from nappies to 'big kid' undies, but do we really need a semi-realistic used toilet cake to do it? Here are some of the best and worst cakes parents have used at 'potty parties' around the world.

7 tips for a financially festive Christmas

Plan ahead - and do it now - to ensure festive season expenses don't break the bank.

'Go the F*** to Sleep' author's new book for frustrated parents

A sequel is coming soon to the 2011 hit book 'Go the F*** to Sleep' - and this time, it's about mealtimes.

Great birthday party buys from Etsy

Handmade crafts to decorate and personalise your child's next birthday - from banners to cake decorations, we've got gorgeous party finds from Etsy.

Join us in The BIG nappy change

Introducing the new Coles Little Explorer Nappies! You can confidently rely on Coles Little Explorer nappies at each stage of your child's growth, so take the Big Nappy Change and try new Coles Little Explorer nappies for yourself!

Creative storage ideas for the kids' rooms

Creative and practical storage ideas for the kids' toys and books can also add some stylish decor to your home. Visit babyology.com.au for more stylish modern finds for hip kids & parents.

Weird trend

Couple has five babies in 14 months

Julie and David Grygla weren't sure they'd ever have kids - but their dreams have now well and truly come true.

To the mum in the doctor's waiting room

Maybe the mum I saw in that waiting room, seemingly disconnected from her baby, doesn’t have the support she needs.

10 space-saving nursery ideas

Starting a family doesn't always mean moving into a bigger house - not yet, anyway.

 

What's in a name?

Baby Names

Looking for a classic name, or an unusual name? Our Baby Name Finder is for you, search or browse to refine your shortlist.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.