Jump to content

Does your child see the speech pathologist?


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#1 sydney75

Posted 11 November 2012 - 09:26 PM

I pay $60 per session for half hour to see the language speech therapist and i have used up all the epc. How long should i continue to see the speech pathologist for? It is so expensive. How do you affford weekly sessions?


1> How much do you pay per session and how long are the sessions?
2> How often does your child see them a week and for how many months?


#2 baddmammajamma

Posted 11 November 2012 - 09:54 PM

Hi mercerdez:

My daughter no longer needs to see a speech therapist, but if memory serves correctly, we were paying $125 for an hour (this was 4 years ago), so very much in the ballpark of your current costs.

You might want to cross post this on the Special Needs/Disabilities board, as many of us there are totally used to having to come up with creative ways to cover the costs of various therapies & specialists. You are in Sydney, right? There might be some local mums who can offer some advice, especially as it relates to free or discounted services.

To answer your second question, my daughter saw her speech therapist until the underlying issues went away. Depending on the severity of a child's needs, that time frame is going to differ child by child.

Although so well worth it, my daughter's early intervention has been really expensive. To be honest, the only way we can afford to do what we are doing for her is to have both of us working. I work part-time (at night) to help cover the costs of her various therapies. It would be tough for us to swing it otherwise.

I don't know how old your kids are, but is there any way you could increase your weekly cash flow? Could you pick up any sort of hourly or part-time work (even something casual like babysitting at home) to give you that extra cushion to afford the sessions?

It sucks that affordable therapy is outside the reach of so many deserving families. Hope you are able to find a way to continue it for your son if it's delivering results. Good luck.

#3 fairymagic

Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:03 PM

Not sure what epc stands for so I apologise if this is what you are talking about.

Two of our three children had speech when they were younger. Our PHI covered some of the cost- I can't remember how much we were out of pocket - maybe $35 per half hour session.

You can apply to get some benefits from Centrelink though. Your Speech Therapist needs to fill out a form - they generally only give benefits to those that have a problem considered significant - our Speech Therapist said she would fill it out but she didn't think we would qualify as our son had already been going a while and had improved significantly and our DD1 wasn't bad enough to start with.

Hope this helps.

#4 Done

Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:24 PM

my ds has been seeing a speechie for 12 months now. we have been seeing them every fortnight during school terms. (school holidays they don't see them)
the progress is very slow!! and his delays are moderate. we have been alternating between the public and the private system. the public will only see for 5 sessions at a time, then they have a break for a term and will see him again for 5 sessions. these public sessions are free and go for 30 minutes, and are fortnightly. i think he would struggle to concentrate longer than 30 minutes tbh.

so the term that we don't see the public speechie, we go privately the cost is $70. for 30 minutes.

we don't do weekly with the private because of the cost, and also it gives us a chance to get the homework done and make some progress at home

not sure what epc is either....

#5 Sue Heck

Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:48 PM

Mine was going too university clinic. She was seeing students but it was all properly supervised and assessed. And very affordable at about $20 a session. If you are near enough to a university with a speech pathology course it may be an option.



#6 sydney75

Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:56 PM

QUOTE (fairymagic @ 11/11/2012, 11:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not sure what epc stands for so I apologise if this is what you are talking about.

Two of our three children had speech when they were younger. Our PHI covered some of the cost- I can't remember how much we were out of pocket - maybe $35 per half hour session.

You can apply to get some benefits from Centrelink though. Your Speech Therapist needs to fill out a form - they generally only give benefits to those that have a problem considered significant - our Speech Therapist said she would fill it out but she didn't think we would qualify as our son had already been going a while and had improved significantly and our DD1 wasn't bad enough to start with.

Hope this helps.



EPC -  Enhanced primary care plan that entitles you to 5 visits a year. Its through a doctor and you can claim through medicare $50 and you pay the gap.

#7 newwoman1

Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:02 PM

Our DS is nearly 11and he has been going to speech since he was 3.....long road.  Went privately from age of 3 to 6 then in school system hasn't been getting much out of school sessions so this year back in to private we are paying $100 for 45 mins only going monthly now.


#8 lylac

Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:02 PM

We pay $70 per half hour.

My son goes once per week (he has funding).
My daughter goes once a month, because that's all we can afford.

I always stay and watch and learn.

#9 JaneLane

Posted 12 November 2012 - 06:50 AM

My 4 year old DS1 goes once a week for half an hour and we pay $70.  He has been going for about 6 months now and to begin with our PHI paid most of it- only cost us $28 but now we seem to have used up out limit for it and pay the full $70. He has hearing loss from constant ear infections and fluid and will be having grommets soon.  They should help improve his hearing a lot and also his speech as he will be able to hear words properly.  If the grommets do work for improving his speech, we will scale back appointments and stop going when he starts being able to say words properly. If not, I think we will have to change it to fortnightly anyway as it is just getting too much to pay every week.

#10 IsolaBella

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:03 AM

We are at $2.5 k for the past 6m of speech. Only $200 in total back.babout to intensively increase services. So I estimate $5 k OPE by  Feb ( that is July -Feb costs).

We are doing work to get DS2 ready for school

#11 kazzamama

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:18 AM

Depending on what your child is seeing the speechie for, see if there is any more you can be doing at home... when I was seeing clients, the ones who did home practice always came along much more quickly - although some issues will require ongoing therapy no matter what.
Can you go to fortnightly sessions? Hopefully the speechie will be understanding of your need to budget, but please try not to let money get in the way of a needed service for your child.
All the best!

#12 -*meh*-

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:21 AM

DS2 sees a speechie once a week through the school and is making great progress with her...

however this is also backed up with the work of an SSO through the school who works on his speech program along with his reading when she helps in his class.

so essentially he does a 45min session with the speechie and 2 other small sessions, plus any additional work we do at home.

but i think it also depends on what the speech problem is.

#13 Sentient Puddle

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:27 AM

QUOTE
but please try not to let money get in the way of a needed service for your child.
Yep - everything is just that simple isnt it!  I am sure we all need to be reminded that we should be doing more for our children  (despite the OP actively seeking further options for her child)!  What a peach!

Maybe we should be shouting this to the Govt and not laying guilt trips on a Mother already attempting to do their best for their child!

#14 Julie3Girls

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:32 AM

My DD2 went for a while - about 8 months before school, half of kinder, then a break, and a bit more at the start of year 1. Way beyond the 5 sessions.

So the answer for how long ... until the problem is fixed.

We were only on weekly sessions for a while at the start. Then back to fortnightly.
Towards the end, we were on monthly appointments.

We were able to claim back about half on our PHI, although we did hit limits with that, so some appointments we were paying the full $65 for 1/2 hr session.

What it comes down to is how often you can afford, and how often is necessary.  I was very involved - the speechie gave us exercises to do at home, and we did them, and I incorporated a lot of stuff into our everyday routine. A month between appts won't work if you don't know what to do in the meantime.

#15 adl

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:32 AM

DS 2 has been seeing speechie for 5 months, at first it was every2-3 weeks while we did hearing tests saw ENt...since Sept we go weekly, she cut his 45min fortnightly session into half so to up the frequency to weekly, so we pay $75 a fortnight...

The demand in Sydney in our area is very high, I doubt we would get in, at the moment we get $35 back from PHI but we will hit limit soon....

I have found the shorter weekly sessions much better for progress and cross fingers we will finish zoo, he has no issues just doesn't want to speak but has started finally vocalizing nearly all the time so we see the benefit

Good luck, the uni option sounds promising

#16 qak

Posted 12 November 2012 - 07:34 AM

We were paying $55/$60 per session, DD went for about 7 sessions. Now we have to wait till she is a bit older to check if her speech is developmentally appropriate - she is now 4.5.

DS went fortnightly for about 6 months, at about age 2.5.

I think your son is a bit older? I too would be asking the speechie for exercises/practice at home to support the work being done in therapy.  Do they offer group sessions that may be of use (obviously only if they will help your child).

#17 mummy.to.one

Posted 12 November 2012 - 08:16 AM

We now see one every fortnight and pay $70, I think we get back around $30 from PHI. We used our epc on his physio this year but next year I will get it for speech, even though 5visits isn't much when you see someone every fortnight original.gif

Our speechie mentioned a carers allowance? I forgot to ask our paed about it but I'm waiting on a call from him in regards to some test results so will ask him then.

#18 frizzle

Posted 12 November 2012 - 09:12 AM

DS is 5 and has been in therapy since about 18 months. We go weekly and it's 165 per hour. We will be going until goodness knows when as he has autism and is still making gains but also still delayed. Money is tight here too especially as I have #2 on the way. We just have to make do. All our funding has been used but he is still autistic. I went back to work to pay for it all plus use our phi and juggle epc with mental health for our psych. Ot I pay myself but its more like once a month now.

It's really hard. Next year we will drop back to fortnightly. Dh and I also make sure we do all his homework with him to help things along.

#19 handsfull

Posted 12 November 2012 - 09:35 AM

We have been in speech since DD1 was 3years old.  Initially we were weekly then swapped to fortnightly.  It has been fortnightly ever since.  Visits were initially $60 1/2 hour now they are $75 1/2 hour but thats been over 6 years.....

We use the ECP plan (5 visits) per year and then our private health.  DD1 was diagnosed ASD when she was 7.5 years and we were then able to access the 20 visits in a lifetime! plan.

DD2 also has a speech language impairment (not the same as DD1) and has "piggybacked" off DD1 sessions for a long time.  However she now has her own sessions so its both at approx $150 for both per fortnight.  

As for the cost unfortunately for us its a must and I'm glad we get a little back from private health as well ($30 per session).  We are currently on a break for 4 months at speechie recommendation then back to it early next year.  She wants to see how DD1 goes without therapy.  

It has been amazing the progress DD1 has made and her speech is so much clearer and she is very proper with her words original.gif   She would definitely not be anywhere near understandable if she did not do speech.  If anything I would value it way more highly than OT from our experience.

GL.


#20 unicycle

Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:06 AM

Our experience was a little different to those here, so is perhaps worth noting for people other than the op.Our son's kinder teacher ( vic) assessed all children quickly in term 1and then encouraged us to make a booking ASAP with the speech section attached to the local hospital. This was so we didn't get put on an endless waiting list for a funded program only available to 4 yo kinder kids. We contacted them by week  6 and only had to wait a few weeks for the appointment, first needing a newer audio assessment.Cost: $6:00 a session. The first few in a group, then individual. The parents were present and we were given detailed tasks to do at home. Sessions each week.the focus was on teaching the parent to teach the child and modelling how to intersperse exercises with play rewards.These We did religiously and my child was assessed as ready to leave the program after just over one term and the holiday break. Admittedly the speechie was surprised at the fast progress. we did put in a huge effort at home, though. The remaining issues were judged to be ones not to look into until older and the mouth had grown. Interestingly, the dentist was not concerned about tongue thrusting, as he has a mild underbite, said it was potentially helpful ( just an aside, not really useful)
I was not overly happy with the govt kinder program, but am forever grateful to the committed kinder teacher who was determined " her" kids be given the best chance of accessing a resource I had never heard about and being aware of a problem that I , the mum with him constantly, hadn't picked up on.

#21 miriams

Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:32 AM

$135 an hour, once a week. We have FACHSIA funding this year but were funding it ourselves for one prior.

#22 Mpjp is feral

Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:39 AM

QUOTE (Ferdinand @ 12/11/2012, 07:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ask if you can scale back appointments. We were only seeing the speechie fortnightly (we're now down to every 2 months) but DS's speech issues were/are quite mild, it might not be possible with severe issues.



This IS a good idea. One of my DD's was going weekly, then we changed to another speechie who said that teaching ME what to do with her at home was important and that if Id do the prescribed exercises with mt DD at home then we could easily cut to once a week. But (for my DD's issues) she very much had the philosophy that families are the ones that do teh work and there was limited teaching 9to child) value in 30 mins once a week. We sawa definite improvement with this plan but it did take commitment.

#23 handsfull

Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

QUOTE (unicycle @ 12/11/2012, 11:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Our experience was a little different to those here, so is perhaps worth noting for people other than the op.Our son's kinder teacher ( vic) assessed all children quickly in term 1and then encouraged us to make a booking ASAP with the speech section attached to the local hospital. This was so we didn't get put on an endless waiting list for a funded program only available to 4 yo kinder kids. We contacted them by week  6 and only had to wait a few weeks for the appointment, first needing a newer audio assessment.Cost: $6:00 a session. The first few in a group, then individual. The parents were present and we were given detailed tasks to do at home. Sessions each week.the focus was on teaching the parent to teach the child and modelling how to intersperse exercises with play rewards.These We did religiously and my child was assessed as ready to leave the program after just over one term and the holiday break. Admittedly the speechie was surprised at the fast progress. we did put in a huge effort at home, though. The remaining issues were judged to be ones not to look into until older and the mouth had grown. Interestingly, the dentist was not concerned about tongue thrusting, as he has a mild underbite, said it was potentially helpful ( just an aside, not really useful)
I was not overly happy with the govt kinder program, but am forever grateful to the committed kinder teacher who was determined " her" kids be given the best chance of accessing a resource I had never heard about and being aware of a problem that I , the mum with him constantly, hadn't picked up on.


Interesting what VIC does as QLD does not do that, or haven't in our experience.  They did pick up in kindy there was a speech problem but no access to programs, told us to seek help....

We started private speech soon after but also went on the waiting list through Qld Dept of Health - but it took over a year on the waitlist and by the time we go in it was 3 months before Prep.  They decided to just do testing and have up to date results for Prep and then let Ed Qld would take over.......oh if only that was true.

Luckily we had been in private speech since age 3 because Ed Qld has failed big time.  She was only seen once in two years at her school and not followed up as speechie changed every six months and only visited monthly to her school.  She is severely SLI (latest score 45, 70 is deemed speech impaired in Qld) and I shudder to think what it was back before intervention.  Hence changed schools, private speech and proper diagnosis and verification by new school where she now receives assistance.

Yes some teachers are proactive and helpful, I guess it just depends on access to programs if you can.

Edited by handsfull, 12 November 2012 - 11:44 AM.


#24 IsolaBella

Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

We are in Vic and kinder did not do what PP experienced.



#25 Samistar

Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

My son has been seeing the speech therapist through our local community centre for the past 12 weeks. We started off on the waiting list. Then he had an assessment and he has started his fortnightly 1/2 hour lessons.

I sit in with them and learn how to do is homework with him. I do his homework with him for the recommended 10-15 mins per day and his progress is truly astounding.

From talking with a friend who was paying $70 per lesson each for two of her children, no homework was provided and the progress wasn't noticeable. I would suggest perhaps if there is no sort of community program in your area, to ask the current speech pathologist for homework, because 1/2 an hour  in a fortnight is really a drop in the ocean to a child.
EFS

Edited by 3lilboys, 12 November 2012 - 11:57 AM.





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

A mum's tragic battle against inflammatory breast cancer

At just 37 years of age, with two young sons, Vicki was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer. Now her family wants all women to know the symptoms.

The business of babies around the world

Pregnancy and birth is an intriguing process no matter where you are in the world. One soon-to-be father gleans wisdom from a new guide.

Finding a positive path through IVF

It’s not surprising that IVF is often seen as a negative journey towards the ultimate positive, but having a glass-half-full approach can make a big difference to the experience.

Giving strangers the gift of parenthood

A mum explains why she and her husband are choosing to gift their leftover embryos to help strangers achieve their dream of parenthood.

Does morning sickness get better or worse with each child?

Just as every baby is unique, so is every pregnancy. And that means morning sickness can vary a lot, too.

What's so wrong with looking 'mumsy', anyway?

Why is it that the word ‘mumsy’ has connotations of such a negative nature – but seems to be the only other option apart from ‘yummy’?

Trying to speed up the inevitable

As the waiting game of late pregnancy continues, this mum considers a few things that might hurry things up a little.

One month later: where is William Tyrell?

It has been a little over a month since William Tyrell disappeared from his grandmother's home, 33 long sleepless nights for his family as they mourn the absence of their cheeky young boy.

Winter's child less likely to be moody: study

Babies born in the summer are much more likely to suffer from mood swings when they grow up, while those born in the winter are less likely to become irritable adults, scientists claim.

Single mum of two creates award-winning baby app

Suddenly single with a baby and an 11-year-old son, Tara O?Connell developed an app to improve the lives of mothers who were similarly overwhelmed.

Food for thought: looking after yourself as a new mum

As soon as your baby enters the world, everything else takes a back seat - even the necessities of daily life such as eating are severely compromised, right when you need energy the most.

'Grabbable guts' campaign aims to cut toxic fat

The Live Lighter campaign will take people inside the human body to show the internal dangers of being overweight.

The best and worst month of my life

A new mum's first month of motherhood didn't pan out as expected when she lost a family member weeks after her baby's birth.

Facebook and Apple offer to pay female staff to freeze their eggs

Facebook and Apple are hoping to provide women with the freedom to build their careers without the added pressure of having children at or by a certain age.

How a pregnancy contract could work for you and your partner

The idea of making a 'pregnancy contract' with your partner may sound a bit silly at first, but it can help make the transition to parenthood a lot smoother.

Finding a mum-friendly personal trainer

Burping babies vs burpees – yes, new mums and personal trainers live in different worlds. But they can work together - once you find the right match for you and your lifestyle.

Alleged baby snatch incident a ?misunderstanding?, say police

Police say that an incident in which a man pulled on a woman?s pram while walking a popular Sydney route late last month was a misunderstanding.

Ebola killed my aunt and is shutting down my country

Three weeks ago, my auntie, a midwife, developed a fever. Sitting here in Sydney basked in Australian sunshine, that shouldn't be big news.

The night my ovary burst

One mum shares her frightening experience and vows to never take her health for granted again.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Win 1 of 5 Canon Powershot D30 cameras

Capture life more easily with the Canon Powershot D30. Shockproof, waterproof and dustproof, you can take it almost anywhere and shoot beautiful images, time after time. Enter now!

16 parenting truths you won't find in the baby books

I am five years into this parenting gig and I’ve learnt that sleepless nights and changing dirty nappies are child’s play.

Best and worst potty party cakes

It's nice to celebrate a child making the shift from nappies to 'big kid' undies, but do we really need a semi-realistic used toilet cake to do it? Here are some of the best and worst cakes parents have used at 'potty parties' around the world.

7 tips for a financially festive Christmas

Plan ahead - and do it now - to ensure festive season expenses don't break the bank.

'Go the F*** to Sleep' author's new book for frustrated parents

A sequel is coming soon to the 2011 hit book 'Go the F*** to Sleep' - and this time, it's about mealtimes.

Great birthday party buys from Etsy

Handmade crafts to decorate and personalise your child's next birthday - from banners to cake decorations, we've got gorgeous party finds from Etsy.

Creative storage ideas for the kids' rooms

Creative and practical storage ideas for the kids' toys and books can also add some stylish decor to your home. Visit babyology.com.au for more stylish modern finds for hip kids & parents.

New mum Megan goes topless

Megan Gale has posed topless for magazine's 'sexiest people' issue, five months after welcoming her son.

To the mum in the doctor's waiting room

Maybe the mum I saw in that waiting room, seemingly disconnected from her baby, doesn’t have the support she needs.

10 space-saving nursery ideas

Starting a family doesn't always mean moving into a bigger house - not yet, anyway.

 

What's in a name?

Baby Names

Looking for a classic name, or an unusual name? Our Baby Name Finder is for you, search or browse to refine your shortlist.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.