Jump to content

,


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_~Songbird~_*

Posted 09 November 2012 - 03:03 PM

,

Edited by *SnowFlower*, 20 February 2013 - 07:45 PM.


#2 mokeydoke

Posted 09 November 2012 - 04:24 PM

We have a beautiful lop eared rabbit. She (well, actually a he laughing2.gif but I'm sure he/she doesn't mind- she was a girl for a few weeks before we discovered she was a boy) is very calm and gentle. The kids plop her on their laps like a cushion and just pat her while watching tv. It's very sweet to see!

We keep her inside, in a hutch, and let her outside in a converted climbing frame (climbing frame with chicken wire on the bottom levels) every day for a run/hop. Maybe she is still so gentle because she's inside and handled a lot?

#3 peking homunculus

Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:14 AM

We have 2 rescue rabbits. They have an outdoor hutch for the night time and they roam free in the backyard during the day.

They are not really cuddly, lap bunnies. But they do come up to you and say hello when you go outside and they like being patted

They are my first bunny experience. I have learnt a lot about rabbits from them. I had no idea rabbits were so curious- they explore every inch of the backyard and if something is in a different place they immediately want to know all about it. We used to keep them in a playpen during the day, but they are MUCH happier hopping around. Basically, rabbits like/need some freedom to explore and to exercise. I think you need to give them as much room as you can so they can hop around and be bunnies.

#4 MeHeNDa3

Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:38 AM

We have a New Zealand. He is enormous, and not a fan of being cuddled. We had him desexed about this time last year (he was 6 months old) as he was lunging and biting. He still bites occasionally, usually my 6 year old's ankles while he's weeing mellow.gif He's an inside bunny who goes out the back to "play"

That said, I do love him and he is quite an amusing pet. I'm not sure if it's his breed or just him, but I wouldn't recommend him for kids who want a little rabbit to love on!

#5 JJ

Posted 28 November 2012 - 11:51 AM

We have a dwarf lop (don't be fooled by the dwarf bit - they can get quite big!) and she is fantastic, very loving, affectionate and patient... a real character. She lives in a hutch outside... undercover on the back porch at night/when the weather is bad, and on the grass in the backyard during the day. We also let her out for a run around the backyard regularly, or sometimes she comes to visit inside.

Like PP this is my first rabbit experience, but from what I understand it's not so much the type of rabbit but their individual nature and what they are used to (by nature a lot of rabbits are very jumpy and easily scared). We got ours from a family with children (although a bit older that mine) and lots of animals... they had her for a couple of years before she was given to us, so I'd say she was well and truly used to being handled and being around people and other animals, and had no trouble getting used to us.

Edited by JJ, 28 November 2012 - 11:52 AM.


#6 Flaxen

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:03 PM

I have had rabbits for the most part of my childhood and teenage years.
Netherland dwarfs were my favorite as well as Dwarf Lops
I found male rabbits to be less likely to bite and scratch.
Get them from young (6-10weeks) and ensure correct gentle handling and they will grow to be lovely placid rabbits. Let them run around for a bit out of the hutch before trying to make them sit still, or just choose your times to handle them when they already look to be calm.
Or find a older gentle rabbit needing to be rehomed, as these scenarios often come up.


#7 peking homunculus

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:10 PM

Regular handling of your rabbit will help keep her/him friendly.

I give the bunnies the scraps from my cooking (carrot peels, zucchini tops etc) and give them a gentle pat while they are eating. They now come running out to see me and have a sniff of my foot everytime I go out the backyard.

They have also become more friendly since we stopped trying to pick them up. It scared them and so we all decided that they are not picking up animals. Since we have taken this more gentle approach they have learned to hop back into their hutch every night without much encouragement.

DD has a doll house on the back veranda. We had to put it up on a table because the bunnies kept going inside it and knocking over all the furniture and dolls!

#8 Allymeg69

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:18 PM

We have had two rabbits in the past, the first was a female, variety uncertain but she was a right little so and so, very highly strung, inclined to bite, scratch etc, she was short haired and stiff-eared (as opposed to lop-eared). She was not a pleasant pet, and we let her go to a friend with a property where there was a large outdoor space and other rabbits.

The second rabbit we had was completely different, he was a dwarf lop-eared cashmere (coat length in between short and angora, so not as much brushing required), and he was the most beautiful friend, he behaved like a puppy, followed us around the house and garden, loved being handled and patted. We did get him when he was very small though, unlike number 1 rabbit, so he was raised being used to people, but I believe he had quite a different general temperament.

We used to house our rabbits in fairly large hutches in our garage. Rabbit two spent a fair bit of time out of his cage each day though, in the garage or in a moveable pen on the lawn.

#9 JuniPooks_

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:30 PM

Do people who let bunnies roam have issues with neighborhood cats or no?

#10 Jjbeanz

Posted 28 November 2012 - 12:37 PM

Also do the ones roaming around your yard try to dig a hole to get out?

#11 JJ

Posted 28 November 2012 - 01:40 PM

QUOTE (peking homunculus @ 28/11/2012, 12:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They have also become more friendly since we stopped trying to pick them up. It scared them and so we all decided that they are not picking up animals. Since we have taken this more gentle approach they have learned to hop back into their hutch every night without much encouragement.


Yeah, I also try to keep the picking up to a minimum with ours. She is very placid and doesn't fight or struggle when we do, but I get the feeling that it does stress her out a bit. She doesn't mind sitting on someone's lap in a way that allows her to hop off when she's had enough, but I try not to do too much in-arms holding (even though she's very soft and cuddly and sometimes I'd love to hold her).

We've had the doll house situation too!  laughing2.gif

Edited by JJ, 28 November 2012 - 01:41 PM.


#12 Georgie01

Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:30 AM

We have three rabbits (all rehomed so we go them when they were around 1 year old) - a lop, a lop x and a dwarf netherland x. I've never had bunnies before but they are lovely pets, no noise, easy to care for and it's lovely to have them roaming the garden (they do surprisingly little damage to established gardens and we have mowed once in a year with them keeping the lawn down). You do have to watch their diets, they need to have plenty to chew on, but it's not hard - mine eat the fresh vegie scraps from cooking, oat hay and chaff and graze in the garden.

QUOTE
They have also become more friendly since we stopped trying to pick them up.

This is so true with ours. I only pick them up when necessary and they'll follow me around and climb on me if I sit down, they love being patted. One of the kids is taking longer to learn that they aren't keen to be picked up and they won't let her anywhere near them if they can help it.

QUOTE
Also do the ones roaming around your yard try to dig a hole to get out?

All you need to do is get some wire mesh and run it around the bottom of your fence and a foot or so along the ground inside the fence (I pin ours down with tent pegs). Ours go through digging phases, the girls much more so than the boy. They tend to dig beside a barrier though, so next to the fence/retaining walls etc. I haven't seen them start out in the open and try to burrow under the fence from a distance.

QUOTE
Do people who let bunnies roam have issues with neighborhood cats or no?

We have caught the neighbours' cat chasing one once, several months ago - but we don't often get cats in the yard and don't let the rabbits out into the yard unless we are around.

Ours live in a huge hutch and we have a pen attached so they can be let out for a quick run. They are easy to get back into the pen and hutch in the evening because they know that's when they get fed (I call, shake the food and they come running).

#13 Beltie

Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:57 AM

I used to have a male dwarf lop. I got him when he was 8 weeks and handled him a lot. He didn't like being carried around but loved being picked up to sit on a lap.

Initially he was a roaming outside bunny and he didn't dig at all. I heard somewhere that the males don't do the digging in a rabbit colony. He plumped up a lot once he was desexed (cost $60, he sometimes went to holiday camp with a girl Netherland dwarf) so I had to be careful with his diet. The pantry had to be kept closed because he could smell sultanas a mile off.

They are very social creatures so he quickly became an inside rabbit. He was toilet trained to a litter box in the laundry. He slept under my bed. He would run to the door when he heard a key in the lock then run backward and forward between me and the couch to encourage me to sit down so he could sit on my lap. He'd also groom me by licking with his little pink tongue. He had an accident and died at 8 years old.

Before him I had a female dwarf. She was nothing like the lop. She was a loner, hated being held and barely tolerated patting. She was happier being our moving garden ornament. She lived to 13 and turned into a grumpy old woman which was very funny. She terrified the magpies who dared land in the garden.

When you choose your rabbit it's the same as choosing any animal. You want the one that is friendly, happy to engage with you, not too skitish and not cowering in the corner.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 

Australia's top baby names of 2013

Essential Baby has compiled the data available from government records around the country to bring you the list of Australia's top baby names of 2013.

Sara James: fighting for my daughter

Sara James was a high-profile New York journalist, but it was her own daughter's story which raised the most questions.

Siblings and best of friends

I know we'll have some tense moments. I know there will be arguments. But I also know these two will always have this most beautiful bond.

In defence of mums on the phone

I know news stories always attract a range of opinions, and I know they're a place for people to have an anonymous dig in. However, I also know that this mum bashing has to stop.

Rescue dog Zoey and BFF Jasper star in adorable pics

Photographer, self-professed "crazy dog lady" and mum Grace Chon takes photos of rescue dog Zoey and her 10-month-old son Jasper together. The results are just too cute. See more on Instagram @thegracechon.

Pregnancy essentials for the second and third trimesters

So you're through the first trimester of pregnancy - congratulations! Here are some tips for getting through the next six months as comfortably and happily as possible.

Coles Easter eggs recalled due to presence of tree nuts

An allergic reaction has lead to the urgent recall of a variety of Coles brand Easter eggs.

The ultimate travel stroller: the Mountain Buggy nano

We tried the Mountain Buggy nano and give it an enthusiastic thumbs up. As the ultimate travel stroller, it's practical, has great features, and looks fab, too.

Why I love the small age gap between my kids

Six months after our son turned one, we welcomed son number two into our lives. Yes, the small age gap had been planned - and there are things I love and hate about that small gap.

Parents warned about posting kids' photos online

Parents could be putting their kids at risk by posting images and information online which give away personal details, such as where they go to school and which parks they frequent.

Easter gifts for babies, no chocolate in sight!

If this is your little one?s first Easter you might want to mark the occasion with something a little extra special. Here are 10 Easter gift ideas, which won't harm little teeth.

Mum's the word when it comes to baby news

The arrival of a baby is big news, but friends and family need to understand it is not their news to share.

What?s in your parenting toolbox?

So often as parents, we don?t really talk about our ?parenting toolboxes?. But you need to be aware of what you and your partner are working with, and to decide what does and doesn't fit in your lives.

Classroom pregnancy prank goes viral

An American college professor has had to rethink his strict rule about answering cell phones in class after being the victim of an April Fools' prank that has gone viral.

Download now: Essential Kids Activity Finder app

Got bored kids? Quickly find the best activities for kids wherever you are in Australia with the Essential Kids app.

 
Advertisement
 
Advertisement
 
 
 

What's hot on EB

Win the brand new phil&teds vibe

Check out the good looking new release of the Vibe 3 and the Verve 4-wheeler inline strollers. To celebrate their release, we have a Vibe with double kit to give away.

Baby sleep

From birth to one year and beyond, read about baby sleep, soothing techniques, routines, and sleep school experiences.

Australia's top baby names of 2013

Essential Baby has compiled the data available from government records around the country to bring you the list of Australia's top baby names of 2013.

Video: Dad turns son into action movie hero

Many kids would love to be an action movie hero in real life, but very few will ever be able to see themselves in movies like these.

Toilet training in winter

There?s no need to stop thinking about toilet training just because the temperature is dropping: winter is a good a time as any to start the process.

What do you do all day?

It's the question all new mothers dread. For Kate Fridkis, it's a question that strikes to the heart of what it is to be a woman.

Easter gifts for babies, no chocolate in sight!

If this is your little one?s first Easter you might want to mark the occasion with something a little extra special. Here are 10 Easter gift ideas, which won't harm little teeth.

Video: Baby starts his day with a dance party

Few people start their day the same way this little guy does ? dancing, smiling, and generally having an awesome time.

IKEA announces bed canopy recall

IKEA has recalled its range of bed canopies designed to suspend above children?s beds following reported cases of injuries and entanglement.

 

Free Printable Activities

Keeping little hands busy

Free printable acitivity pages like colouring in, cutting, word finders, mazes, maths activities and puzzles.

 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.