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Who should pay for contraception?


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#1 wonder woman

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:28 AM

Just heard this being discussed on radio the other day...

Should it be individuals themselves directly, private health insurers, or Medicare/government?

If individuals, then within a relationship, should each gender pay for their own or should the total cost be evenly split?

Of course, the issue here is that, like the case with tampons, women currently spend more on female contraception.


edit: Whilst pregnancy is not a medical condition/disease/illness, consider what/whose costs are being avoided by using contraception original.gif

Edited by wonder woman, 09 November 2012 - 02:56 PM.


#2 emlis22

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:37 AM

Individuals for sure. And as for a relationship - I'm on the pill and it's so darn cheap (yes, I am on generic, I know that others spend 5 times what I do) that I couldn't imagine hitting my SO up for the cash.

I do light-heartedly suggest he should pay for my monthly trips to the waxist though wink.gif

Edited for clarification

Edited by emlis22, 09 November 2012 - 11:40 AM.


#3 MintyBiscuit

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:38 AM

individuals. I can't think of any reason that the government or health insurers should pay for it - it's a personal choice to have sex, and if you want to avoid the common side effect of pregnancy you need to take measures to do that.

as far as within a relationship, I think it's a very personal choice. for us, any contraception comes out of the household budget and has done since we started living together almost 8 years ago

#4 FeralFerretOfDoom

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

I think individuals should pay for their own, but I think there is an argument for distribution of condoms by Government and/or community health agencies to targetted communities.

I remember our student union at Uni used to have free condoms at the Union desk, which I always thought was a sensible way to try and prevent unwanted pregnancy and STDs.

#5 WYSIWYG

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

Within my relationship I pay for the pill and DF pays for condoms. I have never really thought about it, just makes sense, I'm on the pill so I am responsible for getting it, DF also insists on wearing condoms, so he is responsible for those.

#6 1miss2littlemen

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:43 AM

your health, your choice, you should be the one to pay? Dont want an STI go get contraception. Dont want a baby go get contraception.....  rolleyes.gif


#7 -*meh*-

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:44 AM

i guess it depends on the type of contraception used...

for something like the pill/iud etc which for a lot of people are a low cost/one off cost then the individual...

if its something that is a regular over the counter/shop type thing such as condoms then it would probably become included in a household budget.

Seeing most contraceptions are on the PBS i think the government are doing their fair share....

#8 katpaws

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:46 AM

I think that preventative measures should always be the cheapest option.

I think that it is in the government's best interest to ensure all Australians have easy and cheap access to contraception.

I guess on an individual basis, all should pay for their own contraceptive devices. I have always paid for mine (and to think of it, DH's too!) but then i have never wanted an unwanted or unplanned pregnancy.

QUOTE
I can't think of any reason that the government or health insurers should pay for it - it's a personal choice to have sex, and if you want to avoid the common side effect of pregnancy you need to take measures to do that.


Well if people don't have access to cheap contraceptives etc and catch STIs or have unwanted pregnancies, the cost generally comes back to the public purse.

Essentially i believe that all women should have access to education and have reproductive autonomy over their own body, and that they should never be denied contraceptives etc or access to services such as safe abortion and maternal care services.


Edited by katpaws, 09 November 2012 - 11:52 AM.


#9 CountryFeral

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:51 AM

Individuals.  Medicare subsidies for low income people make it entirely affordable to the majority.

I don't know if it is still the case but when I lived in the UK many years ago contraception was available free of charge!

People that I knew still paid for their own though so they could exercise personal choice (they also had jobs) - but it was freely available (condoms, pill, diaphragms) if you wished to access.

I did think that was pretty fantastic.  


I've never been in a situation where contraception costs have been so expensive that I have even noticed who was paying?  

My suggestion to those who are finding it thus - nip down to family planning or the HIV awareness office - they'll give you an armful of free condoms.



#10 Feral Becky

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:52 AM

QUOTE (WootFerretOfDoom @ 09/11/2012, 12:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think individuals should pay for their own, but I think there is an argument for distribution of condoms by Government and/or community health agencies to targetted communities.

I remember our student union at Uni used to have free condoms at the Union desk, which I always thought was a sensible way to try and prevent unwanted pregnancy and STDs.



I think this is right. Son said there is a huge fruit bowl full of condoms in the waiting room at the uni doctors too. original.gif

#11 Propaganda

Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:56 AM

I know condoms are sometimes provided free of charge at some places, but they really should be heavily discounted to health care card holders too.

Some types of the pill are heavily discounted for those with health care cards.

As for who should pay otherwise, every individual should be accountable for their own sexual health. Men shouldn't rely on women to be on the pill and women shouldn't rely on men to have condoms.

I will be teaching my daughter that it is her duty to make sure she is protected against both STIs and pregnancy, no matter what she is told by men she is sleeping with. It will be her who has to deal with any pregnancy resulting from unprotected sex, not him, and as a result she needs to make sure she keeps herself safe.

If I ever have sons, I'll be teaching them similarly, though of course at this point in time their sole protection is condom-usage, whereas my daughter can combine contraceptive methods for more adequate protection.

#12 Jane F. Jetson

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:01 PM

A lot of contraceptive options are already heavily subsidised by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, and what we pay is just a co-payment for prescription items - which is a good way of doing it, I think. And as PPs have mentioned there are ways to get hold of free condoms.

In my socialist paradise it would all be paid for by the government though. I'm a big believer in prevention of unwanted pregnancy as opposed to dealing with it post-conception (not to mention STI prevention) and to deny some socio-economic groups this level of reproductive autonomy on the basis of their economic situation is not what I would call equitable.

#13 MrsLexiK

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:05 PM

On the surface the answer was/is simple however when I thought about it a bit more I came up with a different answer.

It depends what sort of concreption we are talking about, I was on one but it wasn't because I was avoiding getting pregnant it was because I have lady issues which only a hyst will fix.  In the meantime I jumped at the chance of trying a medication.  Which yes is sold mainly as a concrecption however for me it was due to health issue.  It is not one that has a generic option nor on the PBS so it was costing alot.  It would have been great if the govt had been able to subside it. Thankfully my health insurance does offer some money back on medications (those not on the PBS) so I got some back, but it still cost me alot of money and much more then if I had been on a generic pill and it wasn't my fault I couldn't go on a generic pill.

However I do understand that the govt can't be providing all medications, it would just be nice if they could provide the one I needed cheaper, but I do understand a small percentage of women are using the medication for my reasons, most would be using it for concreception.

#14 Lady Garden

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:08 PM

I think the government should pay for contraceptives. I imagine it would be much cheaper to pay for contraceptives than it would to pay for unplanned children for their lifetimes via various welfare schemes. But it would be counter-productive, wouldn't it, to discourage new taxpayers being born.

#15 seayork2002

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:11 PM

I won't talk about other threads direct but I am sick of the government being responsible for paying everything, 'you' want to have sex you pay and as I (being a female, science cannot change that) are the one that would end up pregnant I am responsible for myself.

#16 seayork2002

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:13 PM

Why should the government be responible for people who can't afford to have a child? why are they breeding then?

QUOTE (FluffyOscar @ 09/11/2012, 01:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think the government should pay for contraceptives. I imagine it would be much cheaper to pay for contraceptives than it would to pay for unplanned children for their lifetimes via various welfare schemes. But it would be counter-productive, wouldn't it, to discourage new taxpayers being born.



#17 Feral Becky

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:20 PM

QUOTE (seayork2002 @ 09/11/2012, 12:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I won't talk about other threads direct but I am sick of the government being responsible for paying everything, 'you' want to have sex you pay and as I (being a female, science cannot change that) are the one that would end up pregnant I am responsible for myself.



I dunno about you but I am more than happy to pay for my older teenagers contraceptives.
Don't want to be known as Soontobegran2 on EB ohmy.gif

Edited by LindsayMK, 09 November 2012 - 12:21 PM.


#18 Feral Borgia

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:21 PM

QUOTE (FluffyOscar @ 09/11/2012, 01:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I think the government should pay for contraceptives. I imagine it would be much cheaper to pay for contraceptives than it would to pay for unplanned children for their lifetimes via various welfare schemes. But it would be counter-productive, wouldn't it, to discourage new taxpayers being born.

I agree with this.....I mean its easy to have an initial knee jerk reaction to the question and say "you choose to have sex, you pay for the contraceptive ...or pay for the consequences...." And it's the "consequences"  that's the rub.....the tax payer is paying at the moment for my decision not to use contraceptives some 18 months ago ....(through PPS, Medicare etc).....I will try to encourage him to become a responsible tax paying individual at some time in the future so he can thank you all!

But seriously, if it saves the cost of unwanted children, spread of STDs etc ... Why not?

#19 MrsDamonSalvatore

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:25 PM

QUOTE (LindsayMK @ 09/11/2012, 12:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Don't want to be known as Soontobegran2 on EB ohmy.gif


im not 100% sure, but im pretty sure STBG's children who have reproduced are older than teens??
and anyway, STBG is awesome, i think more people should be like her original.gif she is so helpful and lovely and she adores her grandbabies so much it its beautiful....

eta: to answer the actual question, my partner and i share the cost of contraception. sometimes i pay, sometimes he pays. its not an issue and as long as someone pays, i dont think it matters in our situation original.gif

Edited by Mumma Bear :), 09 November 2012 - 12:27 PM.


#20 Feral Becky

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:29 PM

QUOTE (Mumma Bear :) @ 09/11/2012, 12:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
im not 100% sure, but im pretty sure STBG's children who have reproduced are older than teens??
and anyway, STBG is awesome, i think more people should be like her original.gif she is so helpful and lovely and she adores her grandbabies so much it its beautiful....



Oh I love STBG too biggrin.gif  Nearly as much as I love BadCat, BetteBoop and Julian Assange.
I just don't want to be a grandmother YET. biggrin.gif


Carry on..Contraceptives..who should pay... ;)

#21 Beancat

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:30 PM

The government does pay!  the pill is on the PBS and so are IUDs.  When I got my mirena the list price was over $200 but I was only charged about $35

#22 BadCat

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:30 PM

Whoever is having the sex should pay for the contraception, unless they are young enough to ask their parents to cover it.

Of course the government subsidises contraception anyway.

Edited by BadCat, 09 November 2012 - 12:31 PM.


#23 Feral Borgia

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:31 PM

Oh yeh...forgot to answer the other part of the question...at the moment my DH is paying ....paying BIG TIME 'cause he's not getting any!!!

(Abstinence comes at a price too...!)

#24 Bam1

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:31 PM

QUOTE (AgEm_my_world @ 09/11/2012, 12:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
your health, your choice, you should be the one to pay? Dont want an STI go get contraception. Dont want a baby go get contraception.....  rolleyes.gif


It is your health, your choice but in the end society ends up paying a lot for unplanned pregnancies, STIs etc, through healthcare and benefits so to me it would be prudent that it is supplied through medicare the government would probably save a lot of money. Cheap at twice the price!

Until that happens though, each pays for their own, which in a partnership is communal money anyway.

#25 MrsDamonSalvatore

Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:32 PM

QUOTE (LindsayMK @ 09/11/2012, 12:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oh I love STBG too biggrin.gif  Nearly as much as I love BadCat, BetteBoop and Julian Assange.
I just don't want to be a grandmother YET. biggrin.gif


Carry on..Contraceptives..who should pay... wink.gif



tthumbs.gif




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