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#1 Guest_- Poppy -_*

Posted 03 November 2012 - 10:02 PM

sorry to do this girls, thanks for the info but ive got a stalker sad.gif

Edited by 3Bella3, 15 December 2012 - 09:24 AM.


#2 DbdB

Posted 04 November 2012 - 02:45 AM

Have you looked into healthy eating plans that target your metabolism? Also, might be worth chatting to a doc to see if there is a medical reason for it.    My dad lost about 45 kg with cohens, however he followed the rules religiously. He put half of it back on when he stopped - how strict we're you with the different diets?I have seen other ppl do really well with lapband (or whatever it's called!), but that still requires you to be strict yourself. It's possible to eat too much still despite that surgery. Good luck!


#3 Madnesscraves

Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:45 AM

If be speaking to a GP. From your post sounds like once you've lost the wright, the diet stops too.  Unfortunately, losing and keeping weight off means a lifestyle change. if this Is what's happening you may need to see a GP to refer you to the right services.

#4 Rainbow*Seeking

Posted 04 November 2012 - 07:37 AM

I as first banded in 2007 and lost 80 kilos over 2 years.
Last year while pregnant my band " slipped", so they took all the fluid out of it till the rest of my pregnancy. In April this year I had my band remove ( because they never work the same once slipped.) and got bypass.
I put on 30 kils while pregnant. I have now lot that plus 7 more kilos. I wouldn't change a thing, and would do it all again in a heartbeat.

#5 Guest_~Songbird~_*

Posted 04 November 2012 - 01:54 PM

They have just released new research on these type of weightloss surgeries basically highlighting the fact that they simply don't know the longterm affects of them on the human body into old age.

I would be giving losing weight a really good hard try and then sticking with that way of eating and not going back to old habits. Eliminating starchy carbs and going for fresh unprocessed foods makes it very easy to lose weight and it comes off quickly. A lot of obese people are insulin resistant or borderline which makes losing weight whilst still consuming starchy carbs almost impossible - you may fit into this category. Research paleo and give it a 100% go. Paleo because it cuts out crap and starchy carbs, regulates your insulin levels allowing hard to move weight to come off and reversing insulin resistance in the process. Paleo has a lot of very solid scientific research behind it and it isn't fad.

Info here:

http://thepaleodiet.com/the-paleo-diet-premise/
http://thepaleodiet.com/what-to-eat-on-the-paleo-diet/

#6 ms flib

Posted 04 November 2012 - 02:07 PM

I can see you've tried lots of things but you don't really mention exercise and that's something you can make a permanent lifestyle change.

Having said that, I have been trying to lose a few kilos but seem stuck at my current weight. At least it's not going up! I'm just trying to eat a low fat, high vegie and fresh food diet with no cakes, biscuits or junk food. I do eat 2 pieces of chocolate per day however......that's my little treat!

All the best. I know it's hard but surgery may not be the answer.

#7 B.feral3

Posted 04 November 2012 - 02:11 PM

QUOTE (~Songbird~ @ 04/11/2012, 01:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They have just released new research on these type of weightloss surgeries basically highlighting the fact that they simply don't know the longterm affects of them on the human body into old age.


Genuine question, do you know the name or authors of this research. I would be interested in reading it.

I first joined WW 10 years ago after I put on my first 15kg. I was 75kg then. That was 30kg's ago so 45kg needs to come off. I am starting to think a surgical option will be safest. When I say safest, I mean safer than heart disease and diabetes. My blood pressure is sitting at 160/105 and I'm on medication. I've been dieting for 12 years. I'm not not sure spending more years 'dieting' is the answer anymore.

Everyone I have spoken to that has had the band say their only regret is that they didn't get it sooner. Like I said, I would like to read the above research. It is a big decision and I want to be informed.

efs

Edited by Bek+3, 04 November 2012 - 02:17 PM.


#8 twinboys

Posted 04 November 2012 - 02:32 PM

Gastric sleever here - 18months ago

Best thing I have done.
I have lost 30 kgs and keeping it off is very easy.
I had PCOS and nothing worked to keep the weight off.
I was also insulin resistant, so diabetes was just around the corner for me which was a huge surprise.

Before surgery I had an iron guts could eat anything and never suffered from stomach issues like bloating, indigestion, heartburn.
I did have to watch that I didn't get constipated - but I use to eat muesli everyday and that kept things moving.

Now after surgery I do have a more sensitive stomach and often feel a bit 'off' after a meal for approx half and hour until things have digested.
I cannot have a lot of sweet stuff as you get a sugar rebound effect.
I do get constipated as I cannot eat the muesli like I use to - breakfast is not as enjoyable as it once was.
Eating out is no longer that enjoyable as there is too much food served and I can get a bit overwhelmed when I see a lot of food around me (sounds weird but it is a strange sensation)

In response to the lack of research about the surgery - my surgeon pointed out that this type of surgery has been performed for many years but it was for stomach cancer or stomach ulcer candidates. They reaslised that weight loss was one side effect from the surgery.

Like any surgery you have to look into it and you have to be a suitable candidate.
I had a few friends absolutely horrified in what I did.
Three went onto have the same surgery when they saw my results! biggrin.gif

#9 Guest_~Songbird~_*

Posted 04 November 2012 - 02:39 PM

Here is the news article about the research - mostly bone density etc.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/weig...1103-28r59.html

And here is the Garvan Institutes media release on it (it's pretty comprehensive): http://www.garvan.org.au/news-events/news/...bout-bones.html

Edited by ~Songbird~, 04 November 2012 - 02:42 PM.


#10 yodie86

Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:32 PM

Hi OP,

I am 3 months out from gastric sleeve surgery, so far I have lost 28kg in 3 months and have NEVER felt so good. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
What ever happens when I am 80, at least I will get to 80 now, there really was no hope that I would ever get there if I hadn't had the surgery.

#11 MoonPie

Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:43 PM

It really does.



#12 Guest_~Songbird~_*

Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:48 PM

QUOTE (yodie86 @ 04/11/2012, 04:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi OP,

I am 3 months out from gastric sleeve surgery, so far I have lost 28kg in 3 months and have NEVER felt so good. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
What ever happens when I am 80, at least I will get to 80 now, there really was no hope that I would ever get there if I hadn't had the surgery.


But if you don't get your bones and vitamin d levels checked regularly for the rest of your life, you may end up a blob in a wheel chair with bones so fragile they have all snapped!. Also cancer and ms have strong links to low vitamin d levels, another reason to monitor them for life after surgery.

#13 Soontobegran

Posted 04 November 2012 - 03:59 PM

It seems it works very well for many people whom at least have half a chance at living beyond the age of 40 because of the surgery but I do have a friend who has eaten her way around 3 bands and was sleeved about 2 years ago. She lost about 60 kgs and was looking and feeling great but she has now put back on 35 of those kgs in the last 10 months and a gastroscope has proven that she has managed to stretch the portion of stomach she had left.
She made very few lifestyle changes, she just hoped if she ate less the weight would stay off.
Of course this will not be the case for many but I just thought you should know that it is not impossible to gain weight again if you don't also change what you eat and the amount of excercise you do.

Good luck with your journey.

#14 Guest_- Poppy -_*

Posted 04 November 2012 - 04:06 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies.

Im seriously considering it but im very scared of doing it!

Then hopefully find a sport or some sort of excercise I like and stick to it.

I was thinking of doing it in conjunction with Michell Bridges 12wbt - hopefully it will be easier to stick to a diet and eating plan when im not dizzy with hunger and im not carrying around a load of excess weight!

#15 Guest_- Poppy -_*

Posted 04 November 2012 - 04:12 PM

QUOTE (Bek+3 @ 04/11/2012, 03:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Genuine question, do you know the name or authors of this research. I would be interested in reading it.

I first joined WW 10 years ago after I put on my first 15kg. I was 75kg then. That was 30kg's ago so 45kg needs to come off. I am starting to think a surgical option will be safest. When I say safest, I mean safer than heart disease and diabetes. My blood pressure is sitting at 160/105 and I'm on medication. I've been dieting for 12 years. I'm not not sure spending more years 'dieting' is the answer anymore.

Everyone I have spoken to that has had the band say their only regret is that they didn't get it sooner. Like I said, I would like to read the above research. It is a big decision and I want to be informed.

efs


This is what I have been thinking lately.

There is type 1 and type two diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and heart disease on both sides of my family so I can see first had what is going to happen to me if I dont do something else.

Its not an if, its a when.

#16 Guest_- Poppy -_*

Posted 04 November 2012 - 04:22 PM

QUOTE (ParadiseAlly @ 04/11/2012, 08:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I as first banded in 2007 and lost 80 kilos over 2 years.
Last year while pregnant my band " slipped", so they took all the fluid out of it till the rest of my pregnancy. In April this year I had my band remove ( because they never work the same once slipped.) and got bypass.
I put on 30 kils while pregnant. I have now lot that plus 7 more kilos. I wouldn't change a thing, and would do it all again in a heartbeat.



Would you recommend getting the bypass straight off or trying the band first?

I want to get pregnant in about 3 years time and I am a bit worried about if I got a band it would slip while I was pregnant.

Edited by - Poppy -, 04 November 2012 - 04:22 PM.


#17 twinboys

Posted 04 November 2012 - 05:45 PM

Go a sleeve before bypass.
Bypass is usually for those that have stomach issues - like scarring from lap bands.

I know of a lady who fell pregnant after her sleeve was done and all is well with her and her baby!

#18 sarkazm76

Posted 04 November 2012 - 06:13 PM

My mum had a band done and did lose weight - especially at first.  But she hasn't really lost any more and is still very overweight.  I will say the same thing to you I asked her before she got it "if you can't stick to a diet now what makes you think you can after having the surgery" because if you don't also change your lifestyle the results won't come.  Sorry if that sounds harsh but I felt I had to be very honest with my mum at the time - banding is not a quick fix.  The difference with the band is of course you can't physically eat as much... but if, when you are eating, you're putting in sweets and booze instead of salad and protein then you won't get far.

I lost 40kg on Cohens - loved that program, it was so easy once you got started.  BUt I had 5kg to go and fell pregnant so had to stop so I never did the refeed.  I put 25kg on in that pregnancy and then another 25kg afterward.  I weaned at 12 weeks, for other reasons, and tried for over 12 months to get back on Cohens but just couldn't get into it.  Now I've surprisingly fallen pregnant again and I'm 50kg overweight sad.gif  Sux - I literally had 1 successful/ non cheating week on Cohens and then realised I was pregannt, lol.  I have PCOS too and previously wasn't ovulating when this overweight so very surprised to get pregnant!  

Anyway.... my point is that I feel for you as I know the frustration.  Before Cohens nothing worked for me.  At one point I was using ALL my spare time to work out and still not losing.  I said to my trainer that even if my diet wasn't perfect I was doing so much exercise I should still see the scales going down - even if it was just 1kg a month.  Instead I stayed where I was and if I gave up and caved in and ate something naughty I immediately went up 1kg sad.gif  So difficult.  But for the last year my problem has been stress/ time constraints/ sleep deprivation and a terrible sugar addiction.  Thankfully pregnancy and morning sickness and migraines have sorted that out and I've lost 5kg so far this pregnancy.

Good luck with whatever you decide original.gif


#19 PurpleWitch

Posted 05 November 2012 - 09:29 PM

Bands are evil!

Sleeves are awesome.

#20 *Mrs_Cullen*

Posted 05 November 2012 - 09:33 PM

I ♥ my sleeve.


Done in February 12, Starting weight 121.5kgs...today 67kgs and feeling FAB !!!

Cant wait til August 13 for my tt and breast lift

#21 Stinkermouse

Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:47 PM

It does work, but you have to consider it is a lifestyle change no more eating big meals at a restaurant, no more splurges.

After my second child I went to the gym 6 days a week and did every class under the sun to ensure I was working out hard but found I got stuck at a weight and couldn't get down.

I believe from years of yo yo dieting and pregnancy my metabolism was truly screwed up.

In April 2011 I had a sleeve at 134kg, I haven't looked back.

It's been a year and a half and I weigh 76kg and am happy.

I eat small but often but I eat what I want.



#22 Stinkermouse

Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:47 PM

It does work, but you have to consider it is a lifestyle change no more eating big meals at a restaurant, no more splurges.

After my second child I went to the gym 6 days a week and did every class under the sun to ensure I was working out hard but found I got stuck at a weight and couldn't get down.

I believe from years of yo yo dieting and pregnancy my metabolism was truly screwed up.

In April 2011 I had a sleeve at 134kg, I haven't looked back.

It's been a year and a half and I weigh 76kg and am happy.

I eat small but often but I eat what I want.



#23 *Lib*

Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:54 PM

QUOTE (~Songbird~ @ 04/11/2012, 03:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
But if you don't get your bones and vitamin d levels checked regularly for the rest of your life, you may end up a blob in a wheel chair with bones so fragile they have all snapped!. Also cancer and ms have strong links to low vitamin d levels, another reason to monitor them for life after surgery.

Or you could be fat and unable to walk around and die from a heart attack too.

I have had the sleeve. 4 years out. 55kg down. Best thing I ever did.

#24 *Lib*

Posted 06 November 2012 - 01:57 PM

My Before:
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b81/lib1...ey/P4190350.jpg
My after:
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b81/lib1...ey/SAM_0303.jpg

#25 B.feral3

Posted 06 November 2012 - 02:02 PM

Wow *Lib* you look amazing.  cclap.gif

Can I ask what weight you were before you decided to get it done? I am 104kg and in my 12th year of gaining. Also, was it you or a doctor who decided the sleeve was a better option than the band straight up?

Sorry for the questions. You don't have to answer. Also, sorry OP for taking over your thread!!  blush.gif




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