Couple shares beautiful photos of home birth

As a photographer, Brazilian man Gustavo Gomes always thought he would take photos as his partner Priscila Bochi gave birth to their baby.

But it was only after the couple watched O Renascimento do Parto ('The Renaissance Birth'), a documentary about birth, that they knew the photo shoot – and labour – would be happening at home.

In Brazil, more and more women are having caesareans – an article in The Atlantic says that in private hospitals, around 82 per cent of babies are born via caesarean, while the rate is roughly 50 per cent in public hospitals. Home births are rare.

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 Photo: GUSTAVO GOMES/gustavominas.com

The couple hope that by sharing the photos of Bochi giving birth at home over a 20-hour period, they will be encouraging others to do the same, with Gomes telling Mashable, "We hope that these photos can demystify natural and home childbirths and encourage future mothers to avoid unnecessary C-sections."

He said they felt positive throughout the experience, as they had plenty of support with them for the labour. "Priscila and I never felt helpless during the whole process, with a doula, an obstetrician and a pediatrician [with us] ... We are very grateful for her doula, which helped her to go through pain more easily with massages."

Gomes told Buzzfeed that when it comes to home birth, the couple saw far more pros than cons. "Many people might think it can be dangerous, but it's not, if it's been a healthy and regular pregnancy. It's a long and tiresome process, so it helps a lot spending all these hours in an intimate place.

"And sure, sleeping with Violeta by our side on her very first night was priceless."

The proud dad also pointed out that he was far more than just an observer for the experience. "Photographing the labour didn't stop me from helping Priscila and being involved in the process," he said.

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"That's the reason why I don't have any photo of Violeta coming out - I was there to be the first to hold her when she came to light.

"I didn't think about taking a single photo for two hours after I first saw her."

See more of Gomes' work on his website and Instagram.