'It's a beautiful gift': Emma Isaacs live-streams home birth

Emma Isaacs/Instagram
Emma Isaacs/Instagram  

Aussie mum and founder of Business Chicks, Emma Isaacs, has live streamed the home birth of her sixth baby, a beautiful healthy boy.

Isaacs welcomed the latest arrival in a birthing pool, surrounded by her family in their LA home. "We could actually hear sirens and helicopters overhead," she said in a video following the safe delivery. "We're not far from the protests here in LA."

In the early hours of the morning (LA time), Isaacs shared an update to Instagram, that it was go time. "OK friends, looks like we might have some baby action tonight," she wrote. "Contractions about seven minutes apart. I'm going to hand my phone over to friends and family who are here with me (let's hope they know what they're doing!) and will see you all on the other side."

Adding that she was feeling "strong and ready," the mama noted that they would go live "when it feels right".

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The amazing vision captivated viewers around the world.

"Thank you for having us!!  You could feel the family love across the globe," one woman wrote.

"Thank you for letting all of us be a part of your special journey as a family," added another. "It was magical to witness!"

A glowing Isaacs took to Instagram after the birth, to reflect on the "beautiful" experience. "It wasn't as fast as I would have liked," she said with a smile, cradling her newborn son. "I was having really good contractions but when I got in the tub it all stopped ... it's a lesson in patience and not knowing what you're going to get in birth."

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The little boy, who has yet to be named, tipped the scales at a healthy 4.1kg and was born en caul. "It's really, really special," Isaacs said. "Apparently only one in 80,000 babies are born in their sac."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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In fact, it's the second baby in a row to be born en caul to the now mama-of-six. "I don't know what the odds are of that," she said.

Isaacs told her followers that she is recovering well and didn't tear during the birth. "It doesn't hurt to pee," she said with a laugh. "Being in our house with all our things and setting up an environment where I felt safe and supported was a beautiful thing to share in that with you guys. That's our sixth home birth which is kind of crazy and probably our last.

"It's a beautiful gift right now with everything else going on in the world ... It was beautiful to do something so gentle and lovely in a time where the world is a little bit messed up and in pain."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Isaacs, who is mum to Milla, 11, Honey, eight, Indie, seven, Ryder, five and Piper, two, with husband Rowan, was determined to live-stream her birth after being "talked out" of sharing Piper's delivery.

"I threw myself into research and became a highly educated birth consumer, and this collection of knowledge taught me that women are strong, and birth can be amazing," she told 9Honey.

"I am compassionate and open to all women birthing on their own terms, whether that's a planned c-section or otherwise, but my choices have led me to have five home births, which I've loved."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Isaacs said she wanted to play a small part in helping women see that when they're "educated and low-risk, there needn't be these unnecessary levels of fear".

"We're only fed images of drama and emergency and hospitals and masks and surgeons and you also never have to look far to hear a negative birth story. When this is your expectation or experience there's lots of shame involved so you don't want to share it and this leads to fear mongering," she explained.

"The adverse phenomenon happens as well – often when women have great births they don't want to diminish another woman's experience or make her feel bad so they keep their stories to themselves or they water them down.

"I think it's time to bring birth out into the world and not have women feel silenced or ashamed."