'Miracle baby' survives 11-storey fall from balcony

Lucky to be alive ... Musa Dayib in hospital following his near-death fall.
Lucky to be alive ... Musa Dayib in hospital following his near-death fall. 

A 15-month-old who survived an 11-storey fall has been dubbed "the miracle baby".

Musa Dayib is now in a critical but stable condition with a number of serious injuries, including concussion, punctured lung, bruises to his heart and lungs, and a broken spine, arms and ribs.

But after falling more than 30 metres, the boy from Minneapolis, Minnesota, is very lucky to be alive, according to Dr Tina Slusher, of the Hennepin County Medical Center.

The Minneapolis apartment block where the incident took place.
The Minneapolis apartment block where the incident took place. 

"If you and I fell that far, we would be dead,’’ Dr Slusher told the Star Tribune. "He’s a kid. So they tend to be more flexible and pliable than you and I would be.

"Having said that, it’s a real gift from God that he made it because this is a huge fall."

Musa and his three-year-old sister were at home with their father at the time of the accident. When his father left the room to go into the kitchen, the girl opened the door that led to the balcony. 

The spot where baby Musa was found.
The spot where baby Musa was found. 

From there, Musa managed to slip between the balcony railings, which exceeded council standards at 1.2m tall and 13 cm apart. 

"How a child fit through 5 1/2 inches, we don't know yet," complex owner George Sherman told a local TV station.

Musa miraculously avoided falling on the pavement and a steel box below, instead falling onto a pile of mulch. He was conscious and crying when his father rushed down to find him.  

The family and the building's management are now determined to make changes so this doesn't happen to another child.

"What happened is what happened,” Abdir Ahim Amed, the boy's uncle, said. “How can we protect the rest of these kids that stay here ... something’s got to be done.” 

Doctors are unable to say if the child will have permanent damage, and it's expected he will spend at least several weeks in hospital recovering from the near-death fall. 

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